Use Javascript and Ruby for Freedom and Liberty

(Taken from a different thread here)

...

This stuff is wonderful. I have been struggling to find right-wing thinking
programmers. I have created 57 freedom oriented programs, including a web
browser based on Chrome but better, and a programming language that
converts into C++ and looks like Ruby and Python. Most of these programs
are written in Ruby and Crystal.

It seems that almost all programmers are very left wing, dangerously so.

I live in Ottawa.

Could anyone find me high quality peers?

Best regards,

Gregory David Evan Cohen
gregorycohen2@gmail.com is my email

···

---------------------------------

The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript
library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line tool and
perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using textboxes or
command line prompts) to create high quality communications, would be
wonderful.

Think of how poor quality responses to communications can be.

Even on here.

If someone created one or more tools that could be easily added on web
pages, that would augment someone's life to help create goal and value
oriented responses (or original communications), then there is literally
nothing that couldn't solve.

This might be the most useful library ever created.

There could be a tool that would help with democracy. Human being +
augmentive tool = civil discourse, eventually resulting in liberty.

This would enable democracy to work.

Imagine if 50% of all websites used this library.

This would help people to be goal or value oriented, and not be coming up
with terrible communications that, for example, insult people's mothers or
education.

I have yet to make this program. My other programs are BSD licensed on my
server for people who know about my server. I made 61 YouTube videos of my
software before my old computer died :frowning:

I love Ruby

Best regards,

Gregory Cohen

Hi Gregory,

Would like to know more about your projects. One of our projects is
http://www.shortxxvids.com for which we use Ruby quite a lot.
Other related projects, all ruby related are at Saji Hameed · GitLab

I am just an amateur in programming, and I use Ruby almost exclusively (and
in my scientific work as well, to the extent possible).

My personal email is saji.uaizu@gmail.com and website is
http://enformtk.u-aizu.ac.jp/en/views/the-indian-variant.html

saji

···

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 7:03 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

(Taken from a different thread here)

...

This stuff is wonderful. I have been struggling to find right-wing
thinking programmers. I have created 57 freedom oriented programs,
including a web browser based on Chrome but better, and a programming
language that converts into C++ and looks like Ruby and Python. Most of
these programs are written in Ruby and Crystal.

It seems that almost all programmers are very left wing, dangerously so.

I live in Ottawa.

Could anyone find me high quality peers?

Best regards,

Gregory David Evan Cohen
gregorycohen2@gmail.com is my email

---------------------------------

The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript
library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line tool and
perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using textboxes or
command line prompts) to create high quality communications, would be
wonderful.

Think of how poor quality responses to communications can be.

Even on here.

If someone created one or more tools that could be easily added on web
pages, that would augment someone's life to help create goal and value
oriented responses (or original communications), then there is literally
nothing that couldn't solve.

This might be the most useful library ever created.

There could be a tool that would help with democracy. Human being +
augmentive tool = civil discourse, eventually resulting in liberty.

This would enable democracy to work.

Imagine if 50% of all websites used this library.

This would help people to be goal or value oriented, and not be coming up
with terrible communications that, for example, insult people's mothers or
education.

I have yet to make this program. My other programs are BSD licensed on my
server for people who know about my server. I made 61 YouTube videos of my
software before my old computer died :frowning:

I love Ruby

Best regards,

Gregory Cohen

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<ruby-talk list: member options login page>

--

It is possible to write Ruby and compile it to JavaScript.

There are two gems, both aim for different goals:

* https://www.ruby2js.com/ - very lightweight, you can write JavaScript with Ruby syntax; also translates some stdlib/corelib methods, but writing a code that will be both correct Ruby and RubyJS is tricky. Here, compiled with opal: Ruby2JS: an extensible Ruby to modern JavaScript transpiler (make sure to enable the Filters)

* https://www.opalrb.com/ - quite heavyweight, but aims for complete Ruby compatibility. You can take a random Ruby library and bet that it will compile and work and if not, a few changes will be needed, but that's all. It can also compile itself, see: Try Opal: Browser compiler and REPL

It is certainly possible to use either of them to write a Chromium extension. I also explored ways of using GJS with Opal to write a GTK desktop program, though it seems to be a step too far, because Ruby has GTK bindings, but then when you compile Ruby to JS you don't need to have Ruby installed. Also GJS has documentation problems and I think it is only supported on Linux.

(Even though this thread is political in nature, I want to politely ask that we don't talk politics in this sub-thread. Thanks :slight_smile:

···

On 10/1/21 12:02 PM, Gregory Cohen wrote:

The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line tool and perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using textboxes or command line prompts) to create high quality communications, would be wonderful.

Sure, one could use a transpiler.

The relevant question though

Are you interested in collaborating with me in making this software?

My website is ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools

The browser is quite interesting.

···

On Sat, Oct 2, 2021 at 9:59 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:

On 10/1/21 12:02 PM, Gregory Cohen wrote:

>
> The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript
> library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line
> tool and perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using
> textboxes or command line prompts) to create high quality
> communications, would be wonderful.
>
>
It is possible to write Ruby and compile it to JavaScript.

There are two gems, both aim for different goals:

* https://www.ruby2js.com/ - very lightweight, you can write JavaScript
with Ruby syntax; also translates some stdlib/corelib methods, but
writing a code that will be both correct Ruby and RubyJS is tricky.
Here, compiled with opal: Ruby2JS: an extensible Ruby to modern JavaScript transpiler (make sure to
enable the Filters)

* https://www.opalrb.com/ - quite heavyweight, but aims for complete
Ruby compatibility. You can take a random Ruby library and bet that it
will compile and work and if not, a few changes will be needed, but
that's all. It can also compile itself, see: Try Opal: Browser compiler and REPL

It is certainly possible to use either of them to write a Chromium
extension. I also explored ways of using GJS with Opal to write a GTK
desktop program, though it seems to be a step too far, because Ruby has
GTK bindings, but then when you compile Ruby to JS you don't need to
have Ruby installed. Also GJS has documentation problems and I think it
is only supported on Linux.

(Even though this thread is political in nature, I want to politely ask
that we don't talk politics in this sub-thread. Thanks :slight_smile:

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Hi Saji,

My website is ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools

The idea was that I could create a new GNU coreutils.

I learned yesterday that there is a project called "moreutils" that aims to
extend UNIX tools.

However, it is not very good. It is really not very good at all, and it is
very small.

I created around 57 or so different tools in Ruby and Crystal that have
that same aim.

I can explain them.

Assuming I get enough people on the same page as me, I can re-record videos
and upload them to YouTube.

One thing about Crystal, it that the startup time of Crystal is VERY, VERY
fast. It can beat languages like D, for example.

Crystal is an excellent language for creating command line utilities.

I have an emoji converter, a nicer ps, a simpler sed, a simpler in place
sed, a multi-pane web browser with a different browsing paradigm.

I have a tool that one can use like open 'nice pictures of barcelona' cats
monkeys 3, then in my web browser would Google all of those queries, then
show ALL of them, at the same time, in resizable Qt panes.

"open" uses googler, and auto downloads it.

Here's a picture (the theming is a bit weird on my Fedora box)

The browser is written in C += 2, my "programming language", which is a
preprocessor for C++, and handles things like multithreading std::thread or
QThread automatically.

It's written in Ruby. It could be ported to Crystal.

One nice thing about the language is that #includes are automatic. You
don't have to do #include <stdio.h>

It's a work in progress, but it is sufficient to make a web browser.

The browser depends on QTermWidget and QWebEngine. There is no address bar.
The "address bar" is a full featured terminal.

Everything is BSD licensed.

···

On Sat, Oct 2, 2021 at 8:24 PM Saji Hameed <saji@u-aizu.ac.jp> wrote:

Hi Gregory,

Would like to know more about your projects. One of our projects is
http://www.shortxxvids.com for which we use Ruby quite a lot.
Other related projects, all ruby related are at
Saji Hameed · GitLab

I am just an amateur in programming, and I use Ruby almost exclusively
(and in my scientific work as well, to the extent possible).

My personal email is saji.uaizu@gmail.com and website is
http://enformtk.u-aizu.ac.jp/en/views/the-indian-variant.html

saji

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 7:03 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:

(Taken from a different thread here)

...

This stuff is wonderful. I have been struggling to find right-wing
thinking programmers. I have created 57 freedom oriented programs,
including a web browser based on Chrome but better, and a programming
language that converts into C++ and looks like Ruby and Python. Most of
these programs are written in Ruby and Crystal.

It seems that almost all programmers are very left wing, dangerously so.

I live in Ottawa.

Could anyone find me high quality peers?

Best regards,

Gregory David Evan Cohen
gregorycohen2@gmail.com is my email

---------------------------------

The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript
library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line tool and
perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using textboxes or
command line prompts) to create high quality communications, would be
wonderful.

Think of how poor quality responses to communications can be.

Even on here.

If someone created one or more tools that could be easily added on web
pages, that would augment someone's life to help create goal and value
oriented responses (or original communications), then there is literally
nothing that couldn't solve.

This might be the most useful library ever created.

There could be a tool that would help with democracy. Human being +
augmentive tool = civil discourse, eventually resulting in liberty.

This would enable democracy to work.

Imagine if 50% of all websites used this library.

This would help people to be goal or value oriented, and not be coming up
with terrible communications that, for example, insult people's mothers or
education.

I have yet to make this program. My other programs are BSD licensed on my
server for people who know about my server. I made 61 YouTube videos of my
software before my old computer died :frowning:

I love Ruby

Best regards,

Gregory Cohen

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--

ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools

Say you wanted to create a factorial program, that computed factorials. You
could add a few lines of code to this file

https://ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools/gregory_coreutils/build/functions

And then a Crystal executable would be generated.

*FOCUS ON INTERFACES.*

*THE BETTER THE INTERFACE, THE FEWER ARGUMENTS THE PROGRAM HAS, THE BETTER
THE PROGRAM*

···

-----------------------

Most of these tools work, a few are currently bugged or broken.

Download Crystal from crystal-lang.org

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:22 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Saji,

My website is ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools

The idea was that I could create a new GNU coreutils.

I learned yesterday that there is a project called "moreutils" that aims
to extend UNIX tools.

However, it is not very good. It is really not very good at all, and it is
very small.

I created around 57 or so different tools in Ruby and Crystal that have
that same aim.

I can explain them.

Assuming I get enough people on the same page as me, I can re-record
videos and upload them to YouTube.

One thing about Crystal, it that the startup time of Crystal is VERY, VERY
fast. It can beat languages like D, for example.

Crystal is an excellent language for creating command line utilities.

I have an emoji converter, a nicer ps, a simpler sed, a simpler in place
sed, a multi-pane web browser with a different browsing paradigm.

I have a tool that one can use like open 'nice pictures of barcelona' cats
monkeys 3, then in my web browser would Google all of those queries, then
show ALL of them, at the same time, in resizable Qt panes.

"open" uses googler, and auto downloads it.

Here's a picture (the theming is a bit weird on my Fedora box)

https://i.imgur.com/2O7yLCk.png

The browser is written in C += 2, my "programming language", which is a
preprocessor for C++, and handles things like multithreading std::thread or
QThread automatically.

It's written in Ruby. It could be ported to Crystal.

One nice thing about the language is that #includes are automatic. You
don't have to do #include <stdio.h>

It's a work in progress, but it is sufficient to make a web browser.

The browser depends on QTermWidget and QWebEngine. There is no address
bar. The "address bar" is a full featured terminal.

Everything is BSD licensed.

On Sat, Oct 2, 2021 at 8:24 PM Saji Hameed <saji@u-aizu.ac.jp> wrote:

Hi Gregory,

Would like to know more about your projects. One of our projects is
http://www.shortxxvids.com for which we use Ruby quite a lot.
Other related projects, all ruby related are at
Saji Hameed · GitLab

I am just an amateur in programming, and I use Ruby almost exclusively
(and in my scientific work as well, to the extent possible).

My personal email is saji.uaizu@gmail.com and website is
http://enformtk.u-aizu.ac.jp/en/views/the-indian-variant.html

saji

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 7:03 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> >> wrote:

(Taken from a different thread here)

...

This stuff is wonderful. I have been struggling to find right-wing
thinking programmers. I have created 57 freedom oriented programs,
including a web browser based on Chrome but better, and a programming
language that converts into C++ and looks like Ruby and Python. Most of
these programs are written in Ruby and Crystal.

It seems that almost all programmers are very left wing, dangerously so.

I live in Ottawa.

Could anyone find me high quality peers?

Best regards,

Gregory David Evan Cohen
gregorycohen2@gmail.com is my email

---------------------------------

The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript
library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line tool and
perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using textboxes or
command line prompts) to create high quality communications, would be
wonderful.

Think of how poor quality responses to communications can be.

Even on here.

If someone created one or more tools that could be easily added on web
pages, that would augment someone's life to help create goal and value
oriented responses (or original communications), then there is literally
nothing that couldn't solve.

This might be the most useful library ever created.

There could be a tool that would help with democracy. Human being +
augmentive tool = civil discourse, eventually resulting in liberty.

This would enable democracy to work.

Imagine if 50% of all websites used this library.

This would help people to be goal or value oriented, and not be coming
up with terrible communications that, for example, insult people's mothers
or education.

I have yet to make this program. My other programs are BSD licensed on
my server for people who know about my server. I made 61 YouTube videos of
my software before my old computer died :frowning:

I love Ruby

Best regards,

Gregory Cohen

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--

I played around with Opal and it was pretty neat. Best of luck if you all
decide to put more work into it .. I'm sure they would appreciate the help
!

···

On Sat, Oct 2, 2021 at 9:59 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:

On 10/1/21 12:02 PM, Gregory Cohen wrote:

>
> The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript
> library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line
> tool and perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using
> textboxes or command line prompts) to create high quality
> communications, would be wonderful.
>
>
It is possible to write Ruby and compile it to JavaScript.

There are two gems, both aim for different goals:

* https://www.ruby2js.com/ - very lightweight, you can write JavaScript
with Ruby syntax; also translates some stdlib/corelib methods, but
writing a code that will be both correct Ruby and RubyJS is tricky.
Here, compiled with opal: Ruby2JS: an extensible Ruby to modern JavaScript transpiler (make sure to
enable the Filters)

* https://www.opalrb.com/ - quite heavyweight, but aims for complete
Ruby compatibility. You can take a random Ruby library and bet that it
will compile and work and if not, a few changes will be needed, but
that's all. It can also compile itself, see: Try Opal: Browser compiler and REPL]

I live in Montreal, not too far away from you in Ottawa.

I am already busy with tons of projects like this one: Glimmer DSL for
Tk (GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-tk: Glimmer DSL for Tk (MRI Ruby Desktop Development GUI Library))

My only freedom oriented program was the web browser: Connector
(GitHub - AndyObtiva/connector: A minimalist open-source multi-engine web browser built in Ruby with Glimmer DSL for SWT). Totally sucks. Not
recommended even if I use from time to time because Chrome does not
work on the Mac in Safe Mode, but Connector with an older Chromium
does, so it is my safe mode browser when needed.

···

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:33 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools

Say you wanted to create a factorial program, that computed factorials. You could add a few lines of code to this file

https://ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools/gregory_coreutils/build/functions

And then a Crystal executable would be generated.

FOCUS ON INTERFACES.

THE BETTER THE INTERFACE, THE FEWER ARGUMENTS THE PROGRAM HAS, THE BETTER THE PROGRAM

-----------------------

Most of these tools work, a few are currently bugged or broken.

Download Crystal from crystal-lang.org

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:22 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Saji,

My website is ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools

The idea was that I could create a new GNU coreutils.

I learned yesterday that there is a project called "moreutils" that aims to extend UNIX tools.

However, it is not very good. It is really not very good at all, and it is very small.

I created around 57 or so different tools in Ruby and Crystal that have that same aim.

I can explain them.

Assuming I get enough people on the same page as me, I can re-record videos and upload them to YouTube.

One thing about Crystal, it that the startup time of Crystal is VERY, VERY fast. It can beat languages like D, for example.

Crystal is an excellent language for creating command line utilities.

I have an emoji converter, a nicer ps, a simpler sed, a simpler in place sed, a multi-pane web browser with a different browsing paradigm.

I have a tool that one can use like open 'nice pictures of barcelona' cats monkeys 3, then in my web browser would Google all of those queries, then show ALL of them, at the same time, in resizable Qt panes.

"open" uses googler, and auto downloads it.

Here's a picture (the theming is a bit weird on my Fedora box)

https://i.imgur.com/2O7yLCk.png

The browser is written in C += 2, my "programming language", which is a preprocessor for C++, and handles things like multithreading std::thread or QThread automatically.

It's written in Ruby. It could be ported to Crystal.

One nice thing about the language is that #includes are automatic. You don't have to do #include <stdio.h>

It's a work in progress, but it is sufficient to make a web browser.

The browser depends on QTermWidget and QWebEngine. There is no address bar. The "address bar" is a full featured terminal.

Everything is BSD licensed.

On Sat, Oct 2, 2021 at 8:24 PM Saji Hameed <saji@u-aizu.ac.jp> wrote:

Hi Gregory,

Would like to know more about your projects. One of our projects is http://www.shortxxvids.com for which we use Ruby quite a lot.
Other related projects, all ruby related are at Saji Hameed · GitLab

I am just an amateur in programming, and I use Ruby almost exclusively (and in my scientific work as well, to the extent possible).

My personal email is saji.uaizu@gmail.com and website is http://enformtk.u-aizu.ac.jp/en/views/the-indian-variant.html

saji

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 7:03 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

(Taken from a different thread here)

...

This stuff is wonderful. I have been struggling to find right-wing thinking programmers. I have created 57 freedom oriented programs, including a web browser based on Chrome but better, and a programming language that converts into C++ and looks like Ruby and Python. Most of these programs are written in Ruby and Crystal.

It seems that almost all programmers are very left wing, dangerously so.

I live in Ottawa.

Could anyone find me high quality peers?

Best regards,

Gregory David Evan Cohen
gregorycohen2@gmail.com is my email

---------------------------------

The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line tool and perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using textboxes or command line prompts) to create high quality communications, would be wonderful.

Think of how poor quality responses to communications can be.

Even on here.

If someone created one or more tools that could be easily added on web pages, that would augment someone's life to help create goal and value oriented responses (or original communications), then there is literally nothing that couldn't solve.

This might be the most useful library ever created.

There could be a tool that would help with democracy. Human being + augmentive tool = civil discourse, eventually resulting in liberty.

This would enable democracy to work.

Imagine if 50% of all websites used this library.

This would help people to be goal or value oriented, and not be coming up with terrible communications that, for example, insult people's mothers or education.

I have yet to make this program. My other programs are BSD licensed on my server for people who know about my server. I made 61 YouTube videos of my software before my old computer died :frowning:

I love Ruby

Best regards,

Gregory Cohen

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Hey Andy,

I would love to collaborate with you.

I'm working on a Gem. I have yet to share it with the general community
here, but it's called democracy

gem install democracy

My web browser is in there

My web browser, while also alpha (I'm using Qt for it), works well, and it
has a terminal in it.

Nothing about this
https://www.google.com/search?q=swt+widgets+ubuntu&sxsrf=AOaemvLWz1KjxtwU8duvg-OtJIF8ceTsnw:1634701132802&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiq6tWiiNjzAhWfmWoFHcIxC5EQ_AUoAXoECAEQAw&biw=1280&bih=667&dpr=1#imgrc=U3aPm1WRUjvaRM
looks
native.

It is cool that you are building a web browser!

You could use my "open" program for Google integration.

There are many, many things I haven't talked about yet :slight_smile:

Best regards,
Gregory Cohen

···

On Tue, Oct 19, 2021 at 5:16 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

I live in Montreal, not too far away from you in Ottawa.

I am already busy with tons of projects like this one: Glimmer DSL for
Tk (GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-tk: Glimmer DSL for Tk (MRI Ruby Desktop Development GUI Library))

My only freedom oriented program was the web browser: Connector
(GitHub - AndyObtiva/connector: A minimalist open-source multi-engine web browser built in Ruby with Glimmer DSL for SWT). Totally sucks. Not
recommended even if I use from time to time because Chrome does not
work on the Mac in Safe Mode, but Connector with an older Chromium
does, so it is my safe mode browser when needed.

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:33 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>
> ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools
>
> Say you wanted to create a factorial program, that computed factorials.
You could add a few lines of code to this file
>
>
>
https://ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools/gregory_coreutils/build/functions
>
>
> And then a Crystal executable would be generated.
>
> FOCUS ON INTERFACES.
>
> THE BETTER THE INTERFACE, THE FEWER ARGUMENTS THE PROGRAM HAS, THE
BETTER THE PROGRAM
>
>
> -----------------------
>
>
> Most of these tools work, a few are currently bugged or broken.
>
> Download Crystal from crystal-lang.org
>
>
> On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:22 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>>
>> Hi Saji,
>>
>> My website is ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools
>>
>> The idea was that I could create a new GNU coreutils.
>>
>> I learned yesterday that there is a project called "moreutils" that
aims to extend UNIX tools.
>>
>> However, it is not very good. It is really not very good at all, and it
is very small.
>>
>> I created around 57 or so different tools in Ruby and Crystal that have
that same aim.
>>
>> I can explain them.
>>
>> Assuming I get enough people on the same page as me, I can re-record
videos and upload them to YouTube.
>>
>> One thing about Crystal, it that the startup time of Crystal is VERY,
VERY fast. It can beat languages like D, for example.
>>
>> Crystal is an excellent language for creating command line utilities.
>>
>> I have an emoji converter, a nicer ps, a simpler sed, a simpler in
place sed, a multi-pane web browser with a different browsing paradigm.
>>
>> I have a tool that one can use like open 'nice pictures of barcelona'
cats monkeys 3, then in my web browser would Google all of those queries,
then show ALL of them, at the same time, in resizable Qt panes.
>>
>> "open" uses googler, and auto downloads it.
>>
>> Here's a picture (the theming is a bit weird on my Fedora box)
>>
>> https://i.imgur.com/2O7yLCk.png
>>
>> The browser is written in C += 2, my "programming language", which is a
preprocessor for C++, and handles things like multithreading std::thread or
QThread automatically.
>>
>> It's written in Ruby. It could be ported to Crystal.
>>
>> One nice thing about the language is that #includes are automatic. You
don't have to do #include <stdio.h>
>>
>> It's a work in progress, but it is sufficient to make a web browser.
>>
>>
>> The browser depends on QTermWidget and QWebEngine. There is no address
bar. The "address bar" is a full featured terminal.
>>
>> Everything is BSD licensed.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Oct 2, 2021 at 8:24 PM Saji Hameed <saji@u-aizu.ac.jp> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi Gregory,
>>>
>>> Would like to know more about your projects. One of our projects is
http://www.shortxxvids.com for which we use Ruby quite a lot.
>>> Other related projects, all ruby related are at
Saji Hameed · GitLab
>>>
>>> I am just an amateur in programming, and I use Ruby almost exclusively
(and in my scientific work as well, to the extent possible).
>>>
>>> My personal email is saji.uaizu@gmail.com and website is
http://enformtk.u-aizu.ac.jp/en/views/the-indian-variant.html
>>>
>>> saji
>>>
>>> On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 7:03 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>>>>
>>>> (Taken from a different thread here)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> This stuff is wonderful. I have been struggling to find right-wing
thinking programmers. I have created 57 freedom oriented programs,
including a web browser based on Chrome but better, and a programming
language that converts into C++ and looks like Ruby and Python. Most of
these programs are written in Ruby and Crystal.
>>>>
>>>> It seems that almost all programmers are very left wing, dangerously
so.
>>>>
>>>> I live in Ottawa.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Could anyone find me high quality peers?
>>>>
>>>> Best regards,
>>>>
>>>> Gregory David Evan Cohen
>>>> gregorycohen2@gmail.com is my email
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ---------------------------------
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript
library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line tool and
perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using textboxes or
command line prompts) to create high quality communications, would be
wonderful.
>>>>
>>>> Think of how poor quality responses to communications can be.
>>>>
>>>> Even on here.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> If someone created one or more tools that could be easily added on
web pages, that would augment someone's life to help create goal and value
oriented responses (or original communications), then there is literally
nothing that couldn't solve.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> This might be the most useful library ever created.
>>>>
>>>> There could be a tool that would help with democracy. Human being +
augmentive tool = civil discourse, eventually resulting in liberty.
>>>>
>>>> This would enable democracy to work.
>>>>
>>>> Imagine if 50% of all websites used this library.
>>>>
>>>> This would help people to be goal or value oriented, and not be
coming up with terrible communications that, for example, insult people's
mothers or education.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I have yet to make this program. My other programs are BSD licensed
on my server for people who know about my server. I made 61 YouTube videos
of my software before my old computer died :frowning:
>>>>
>>>> I love Ruby
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Best regards,
>>>>
>>>> Gregory Cohen
>>>>
>>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>>> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
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Hey Andy,

So, I already made a desktop GTK program in Ruby using Gtk.

"My only freedom oriented program was the web browser". You have no idea
what you're talking about

Your libraries are good

(But they are not very Linux centric, that is quite obvious)

*Your libraries do give freedom*

Glimmer and Opal do give freedom, and you and hmdne@airmail.cc should be
proud of yourselves, sincerely

I'm going to target my software to common people, not programmers.

I'm probably even going to put an anti-nerd or anti-techy spin in the mix

To some extent, I need to reject the programming world

That democracy idea, a library for civil discourse, is mostly done now.

There are going to be roughly 10 input sources and 10 output sources

···

---------------------------------------

The biggest thing I lack, is peers and community

I am 26, I have a really bad family. I'm completely out of communication
with them, and both of my parents are now dead.

My family never helped me, and are sociopaths.

Very few people are on the same page as me.

I don't care about money, about careers, about presenting myself in a
certain way.

I care about truth, discussion, discourse, rebellion, fighting, liberty.

What I'm working on will handle the rock bottom reasons why people don't
have sensible communication, and address it directly, using from a range of
10 input sources, and yes, WebSpeech is amongst them. People's phones and
browsers could talk to people, and get them having good conversations

Maybe we could meet in person?

Just don't put yourself down.

Don't let other people degrade your projects.

There are many, many other aspects of my life that are good. I have
connections. I have influenced people and things.

I came from some of the most underpriveldged circumstances, and I had the
least amount of support, and the least amount of disscussion and empathy to
me.

God, I wasn't able to have a proper conversation with either of my parents,
ever. They would rather die than to be empathetic, than to care for others.

And so they did.

They intentionally lost all their money in stupid ways, because not doing
that would "help" other people, that they wouldn't tolerate "helping"
family.

But I managed to influence things and I will have a lot of money and clout,
in LA and in general.

Now that they're both dead, there is no one who could bring me down.

But what I want to do is be brought up :slight_smile:

But, it is very clear, the median computer programmer in the current world
is a liability for humanity

I also lack money.

I certainly will have lots of money in the future. I am waiting on certain
people, and then I will have a lot of money (not inheritance, as a result
of my actions)

But in the meanwhile, I am lonely, very very lonely, and it does affect my
mental health, not being on the same page as others, and arbitrarily being
put out of touch with other people, for no reason, and having to wait years.

The remissness and neglience of the computer programming field,
categorically, over the last 50 years or so, should be considered a crime
against humanity.

Countless trouble and suffering has resulted from it. One recent example is
Facebook, but there are hundreds of thousands of others.

Probably most programming right now in the current world harm people.

This is not good.

I recently learned about Rubocop. I recently made some autoformatting tools
for myself.
My new project is very modular, very object oriented, and can run on all
platforms, with minimal dependencies.

It got it running at the apple store using Gem, on Windows and Linux

I'm using Opal.

On Tue, Oct 19, 2021 at 5:16 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

I live in Montreal, not too far away from you in Ottawa.

I am already busy with tons of projects like this one: Glimmer DSL for
Tk (GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-tk: Glimmer DSL for Tk (MRI Ruby Desktop Development GUI Library))

My only freedom oriented program was the web browser: Connector
(GitHub - AndyObtiva/connector: A minimalist open-source multi-engine web browser built in Ruby with Glimmer DSL for SWT). Totally sucks. Not
recommended even if I use from time to time because Chrome does not
work on the Mac in Safe Mode, but Connector with an older Chromium
does, so it is my safe mode browser when needed.

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:33 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>
> ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools
>
> Say you wanted to create a factorial program, that computed factorials.
You could add a few lines of code to this file
>
>
>
https://ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools/gregory_coreutils/build/functions
>
>
> And then a Crystal executable would be generated.
>
> FOCUS ON INTERFACES.
>
> THE BETTER THE INTERFACE, THE FEWER ARGUMENTS THE PROGRAM HAS, THE
BETTER THE PROGRAM
>
>
> -----------------------
>
>
> Most of these tools work, a few are currently bugged or broken.
>
> Download Crystal from crystal-lang.org
>
>
> On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:22 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>>
>> Hi Saji,
>>
>> My website is ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools
>>
>> The idea was that I could create a new GNU coreutils.
>>
>> I learned yesterday that there is a project called "moreutils" that
aims to extend UNIX tools.
>>
>> However, it is not very good. It is really not very good at all, and it
is very small.
>>
>> I created around 57 or so different tools in Ruby and Crystal that have
that same aim.
>>
>> I can explain them.
>>
>> Assuming I get enough people on the same page as me, I can re-record
videos and upload them to YouTube.
>>
>> One thing about Crystal, it that the startup time of Crystal is VERY,
VERY fast. It can beat languages like D, for example.
>>
>> Crystal is an excellent language for creating command line utilities.
>>
>> I have an emoji converter, a nicer ps, a simpler sed, a simpler in
place sed, a multi-pane web browser with a different browsing paradigm.
>>
>> I have a tool that one can use like open 'nice pictures of barcelona'
cats monkeys 3, then in my web browser would Google all of those queries,
then show ALL of them, at the same time, in resizable Qt panes.
>>
>> "open" uses googler, and auto downloads it.
>>
>> Here's a picture (the theming is a bit weird on my Fedora box)
>>
>> https://i.imgur.com/2O7yLCk.png
>>
>> The browser is written in C += 2, my "programming language", which is a
preprocessor for C++, and handles things like multithreading std::thread or
QThread automatically.
>>
>> It's written in Ruby. It could be ported to Crystal.
>>
>> One nice thing about the language is that #includes are automatic. You
don't have to do #include <stdio.h>
>>
>> It's a work in progress, but it is sufficient to make a web browser.
>>
>>
>> The browser depends on QTermWidget and QWebEngine. There is no address
bar. The "address bar" is a full featured terminal.
>>
>> Everything is BSD licensed.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Oct 2, 2021 at 8:24 PM Saji Hameed <saji@u-aizu.ac.jp> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi Gregory,
>>>
>>> Would like to know more about your projects. One of our projects is
http://www.shortxxvids.com for which we use Ruby quite a lot.
>>> Other related projects, all ruby related are at
Saji Hameed · GitLab
>>>
>>> I am just an amateur in programming, and I use Ruby almost exclusively
(and in my scientific work as well, to the extent possible).
>>>
>>> My personal email is saji.uaizu@gmail.com and website is
http://enformtk.u-aizu.ac.jp/en/views/the-indian-variant.html
>>>
>>> saji
>>>
>>> On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 7:03 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>>>>
>>>> (Taken from a different thread here)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> This stuff is wonderful. I have been struggling to find right-wing
thinking programmers. I have created 57 freedom oriented programs,
including a web browser based on Chrome but better, and a programming
language that converts into C++ and looks like Ruby and Python. Most of
these programs are written in Ruby and Crystal.
>>>>
>>>> It seems that almost all programmers are very left wing, dangerously
so.
>>>>
>>>> I live in Ottawa.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Could anyone find me high quality peers?
>>>>
>>>> Best regards,
>>>>
>>>> Gregory David Evan Cohen
>>>> gregorycohen2@gmail.com is my email
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ---------------------------------
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript
library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line tool and
perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using textboxes or
command line prompts) to create high quality communications, would be
wonderful.
>>>>
>>>> Think of how poor quality responses to communications can be.
>>>>
>>>> Even on here.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> If someone created one or more tools that could be easily added on
web pages, that would augment someone's life to help create goal and value
oriented responses (or original communications), then there is literally
nothing that couldn't solve.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> This might be the most useful library ever created.
>>>>
>>>> There could be a tool that would help with democracy. Human being +
augmentive tool = civil discourse, eventually resulting in liberty.
>>>>
>>>> This would enable democracy to work.
>>>>
>>>> Imagine if 50% of all websites used this library.
>>>>
>>>> This would help people to be goal or value oriented, and not be
coming up with terrible communications that, for example, insult people's
mothers or education.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I have yet to make this program. My other programs are BSD licensed
on my server for people who know about my server. I made 61 YouTube videos
of my software before my old computer died :frowning:
>>>>
>>>> I love Ruby
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Best regards,
>>>>
>>>> Gregory Cohen
>>>>
>>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>>> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

"Nothing about this
https://www.google.com/search?q=swt+widgets+ubuntu&sxsrf=AOaemvLWz1KjxtwU8duvg-OtJIF8ceTsnw:1634701132802&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiq6tWiiNjzAhWfmWoFHcIxC5EQ_AUoAXoECAEQAw&biw=1280&bih=667&dpr=1#imgrc=U3aPm1WRUjvaRM
looks native."

The screenshot you shared is neither Windows nor Mac, so you would be
wrong to expect it to look Windows-native or Mac-native as it is in
fact perfectly native on Ubuntu. If you want Windows or Mac native,
here are some screenshots:

This sample has Mac native screenshots:

SWT is a very old and well established native GUI toolkit (since the
early 2000s). Debating it is pointless since it is proven and everyone
knows it's native. Arguing that point is only a waste of time and
wouldn't change anything as there is nothing to prove for an already
proven toolkit that is not affected by our conversation either way. It
would be much more productive if you'd install Glimmer DSL for SWT
(GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-swt: Glimmer DSL for SWT (JRuby Desktop Development GUI Framework)) and start tinkering
with building native GUI on your operating system instead. That way,
you will learn something new.

I found your 'democracy' gem here: democracy | RubyGems.org | your community gem host

I'll take a look at it. Thanks for sharing.

BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because it
is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem page:
qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)

Cheers,

Andy

···

On Tue, Oct 19, 2021 at 11:44 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

Hey Andy,

I would love to collaborate with you.

I'm working on a Gem. I have yet to share it with the general community here, but it's called democracy

gem install democracy

My web browser is in there

My web browser, while also alpha (I'm using Qt for it), works well, and it has a terminal in it.

Nothing about this https://www.google.com/search?q=swt+widgets+ubuntu&sxsrf=AOaemvLWz1KjxtwU8duvg-OtJIF8ceTsnw:1634701132802&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiq6tWiiNjzAhWfmWoFHcIxC5EQ_AUoAXoECAEQAw&biw=1280&bih=667&dpr=1#imgrc=U3aPm1WRUjvaRM looks native.

It is cool that you are building a web browser!

You could use my "open" program for Google integration.

There are many, many things I haven't talked about yet :slight_smile:

Best regards,
Gregory Cohen

On Tue, Oct 19, 2021 at 5:16 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

I live in Montreal, not too far away from you in Ottawa.

I am already busy with tons of projects like this one: Glimmer DSL for
Tk (GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-tk: Glimmer DSL for Tk (MRI Ruby Desktop Development GUI Library))

My only freedom oriented program was the web browser: Connector
(GitHub - AndyObtiva/connector: A minimalist open-source multi-engine web browser built in Ruby with Glimmer DSL for SWT). Totally sucks. Not
recommended even if I use from time to time because Chrome does not
work on the Mac in Safe Mode, but Connector with an older Chromium
does, so it is my safe mode browser when needed.

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:33 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools
>
> Say you wanted to create a factorial program, that computed factorials. You could add a few lines of code to this file
>
>
> https://ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools/gregory_coreutils/build/functions
>
>
> And then a Crystal executable would be generated.
>
> FOCUS ON INTERFACES.
>
> THE BETTER THE INTERFACE, THE FEWER ARGUMENTS THE PROGRAM HAS, THE BETTER THE PROGRAM
>
>
> -----------------------
>
>
> Most of these tools work, a few are currently bugged or broken.
>
> Download Crystal from crystal-lang.org
>
>
> On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:22 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> Hi Saji,
>>
>> My website is ethicify.online/improve_the_world/tools
>>
>> The idea was that I could create a new GNU coreutils.
>>
>> I learned yesterday that there is a project called "moreutils" that aims to extend UNIX tools.
>>
>> However, it is not very good. It is really not very good at all, and it is very small.
>>
>> I created around 57 or so different tools in Ruby and Crystal that have that same aim.
>>
>> I can explain them.
>>
>> Assuming I get enough people on the same page as me, I can re-record videos and upload them to YouTube.
>>
>> One thing about Crystal, it that the startup time of Crystal is VERY, VERY fast. It can beat languages like D, for example.
>>
>> Crystal is an excellent language for creating command line utilities.
>>
>> I have an emoji converter, a nicer ps, a simpler sed, a simpler in place sed, a multi-pane web browser with a different browsing paradigm.
>>
>> I have a tool that one can use like open 'nice pictures of barcelona' cats monkeys 3, then in my web browser would Google all of those queries, then show ALL of them, at the same time, in resizable Qt panes.
>>
>> "open" uses googler, and auto downloads it.
>>
>> Here's a picture (the theming is a bit weird on my Fedora box)
>>
>> https://i.imgur.com/2O7yLCk.png
>>
>> The browser is written in C += 2, my "programming language", which is a preprocessor for C++, and handles things like multithreading std::thread or QThread automatically.
>>
>> It's written in Ruby. It could be ported to Crystal.
>>
>> One nice thing about the language is that #includes are automatic. You don't have to do #include <stdio.h>
>>
>> It's a work in progress, but it is sufficient to make a web browser.
>>
>>
>> The browser depends on QTermWidget and QWebEngine. There is no address bar. The "address bar" is a full featured terminal.
>>
>> Everything is BSD licensed.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Oct 2, 2021 at 8:24 PM Saji Hameed <saji@u-aizu.ac.jp> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hi Gregory,
>>>
>>> Would like to know more about your projects. One of our projects is http://www.shortxxvids.com for which we use Ruby quite a lot.
>>> Other related projects, all ruby related are at Saji Hameed · GitLab
>>>
>>> I am just an amateur in programming, and I use Ruby almost exclusively (and in my scientific work as well, to the extent possible).
>>>
>>> My personal email is saji.uaizu@gmail.com and website is http://enformtk.u-aizu.ac.jp/en/views/the-indian-variant.html
>>>
>>> saji
>>>
>>> On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 7:03 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> (Taken from a different thread here)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> This stuff is wonderful. I have been struggling to find right-wing thinking programmers. I have created 57 freedom oriented programs, including a web browser based on Chrome but better, and a programming language that converts into C++ and looks like Ruby and Python. Most of these programs are written in Ruby and Crystal.
>>>>
>>>> It seems that almost all programmers are very left wing, dangerously so.
>>>>
>>>> I live in Ottawa.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Could anyone find me high quality peers?
>>>>
>>>> Best regards,
>>>>
>>>> Gregory David Evan Cohen
>>>> gregorycohen2@gmail.com is my email
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> ---------------------------------
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> The use of Javascript (and possible Ruby) to create a Javascript library (and perhaps a Chrome extension and perhaps a command line tool and perhaps a GTK or QT program) that helps people (by using textboxes or command line prompts) to create high quality communications, would be wonderful.
>>>>
>>>> Think of how poor quality responses to communications can be.
>>>>
>>>> Even on here.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> If someone created one or more tools that could be easily added on web pages, that would augment someone's life to help create goal and value oriented responses (or original communications), then there is literally nothing that couldn't solve.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> This might be the most useful library ever created.
>>>>
>>>> There could be a tool that would help with democracy. Human being + augmentive tool = civil discourse, eventually resulting in liberty.
>>>>
>>>> This would enable democracy to work.
>>>>
>>>> Imagine if 50% of all websites used this library.
>>>>
>>>> This would help people to be goal or value oriented, and not be coming up with terrible communications that, for example, insult people's mothers or education.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> I have yet to make this program. My other programs are BSD licensed on my server for people who know about my server. I made 61 YouTube videos of my software before my old computer died :frowning:
>>>>
>>>> I love Ruby
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Best regards,
>>>>
>>>> Gregory Cohen
>>>>
>>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
>>>> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

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<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie. they don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or worse - I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing apps but apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing - this mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).

The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5 moved mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but syntactically it looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has the legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML + JavaScript is all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++ backend. There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately it isn't developed anymore.

···

On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:

BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because it
is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem page:
qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)

Cheers,

Andy

LibUI does seem nice though

···

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:

On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:

> BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because it
> is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
> signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
> maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem page:
> qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>
> Cheers,
>
> Andy

Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie. they
don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or worse -
I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing apps but
apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing - this
mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).

The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5 moved
mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but syntactically it
looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has the
legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML + JavaScript is
all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++ backend.
There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately it
isn't developed anymore.

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<ruby-talk list: member options login page>

I meant to say

JRuby is taking a long time to install

LibUI does seem nice though

···

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

LibUI does seem nice though

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:

On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:

> BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because it
> is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
> signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
> maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem page:
> qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>
> Cheers,
>
> Andy

Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie. they
don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or worse -
I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing apps but
apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing - this
mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).

The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5 moved
mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but syntactically it
looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has the
legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML + JavaScript is
all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++ backend.
There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately it
isn't developed anymore.

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<ruby-talk list: member options login page>

Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.

By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
on my Mac.

I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.

One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
"I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"

and

"I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"

The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.

Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.

Just my 2 cents.

And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
complexity.

Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
or elsewhere.

Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
thing at a time
(The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn)
to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
another.

I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
love Opal.

About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
them the illusion of freedom.

I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
enterprisey mentality.

For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.

JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
applications.

Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.

Cheers,

Andy

p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
and situation.

···

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

I meant to say

JRuby is taking a long time to install

LibUI does seem nice though

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

LibUI does seem nice though

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:

On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:

> BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because it
> is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
> signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
> maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem page:
> qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>
> Cheers,
>
> Andy

Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie. they
don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or worse -
I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing apps but
apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing - this
mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).

The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5 moved
mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but syntactically it
looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has the
legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML + JavaScript is
all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++ backend.
There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately it
isn't developed anymore.

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<ruby-talk list: member options login page>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<ruby-talk list: member options login page>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: AndyObtiva (Andy Maleh) · GitHub

Hi Andy

OK

So I made a desktop GUI application that is going to help with
documentation!

Kind of hard core, right?

But that might be necessary.

It works on Windows and Linux for sure, and Mac too

It's in the current gem

So people could be immeresed in MY platform

As for religion, we could talk about that kind of stuff in person.

I would like to meet you.

Thank you for the validation about C+= 2

In the aim of completeness, I also must acknowledge the existence of the
Ring programming language

Ring, Crystal and C += 2 all have really good syntax.

I know JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is

a
big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
love Opal.

This is freaking hilarious.

I know like 13 or so programming languages, but I never learned Java.

Javascript is like an extension of Java's badness.

You really need to add GTK bindings to your great project. I couldn't even
install the SWT gem!

Not to mention, the startup time of jruby is really a lot. It takes like
2.2 seconds to run a do-nothing ruby command on my quad-core Mac.

About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that

not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
them the illusion of freedom.

I'm afraid that people can't do this anymore. To be a competent member of a
democracy, people need to be technologically literate. People need to take
smart actions and not be vulnerable to things. Not everyone needs to be a
programmer, but people cannot be vulnerable.

Religion is the most important part of my life, but that is complex.

I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers

only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
enterprisey mentality.

This is not my target audience.

I can't have good conversations with programmers.

I did have an enterprisey mentality, got an investor, rejected him. He was
willing to invest tens of thousands of dollars with me, but he said that if
he was wasting my time, then I should tell him that.

I know how to earn millions of dollars with my skills fairly easily, but
I'm not pursuing that course of action because that would make me feel more
lonely.

If you have a job for me that would make me feel "more together", I could
work for you or someone else.

I don't have a formal Comp. Sci. background and I am not familiar with Rails

I know

* C
* C++
* Bash
* D
* Python
* Ruby
* Some Perl
* Some Php
* Crystal
* Assembly Language
* HTML
* CSS
* Javascript
* Some awk
* My own langauge C += 2

I know some libraries in those languages.

I got into programming when I was 13. I am 26 now. So I have been doing
programming loosely speaking for 13 years.

If someone wants to hire me for a project that would be easy and that would
help me to build a better resume, then OK.

I am "equipped" with useful UNIX tools that I have made, so that might help
my productivity.

I really don't need to worry about money.

All I need to care about it relationships.

I don't care if I get paid a bad wage.

I made some websites for people in the past, but not that many, but I did
make money from those.

···

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 6:32 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.

By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
on my Mac.

I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.

One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
"I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"

and

"I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"

The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.

Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.

Just my 2 cents.

And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
complexity.

Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
or elsewhere.

Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
thing at a time
(
The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn
)
to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
another.

I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
love Opal.

About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
them the illusion of freedom.

I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
enterprisey mentality.

For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.

JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
applications.

Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.

Cheers,

Andy

p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
and situation.

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>
> I meant to say
>
> JRuby is taking a long time to install
>
> LibUI does seem nice though
>
>
>
> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>>
>> LibUI does seem nice though
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:
>>>
>>> On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:
>>>
>>> > BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because it
>>> > is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
>>> > signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
>>> > maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem page:
>>> > qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>>> >
>>> > Cheers,
>>> >
>>> > Andy
>>>
>>> Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
>>> platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie. they
>>> don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or worse -
>>> I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing apps
but
>>> apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing - this
>>> mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).
>>>
>>> The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5 moved
>>> mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but syntactically
it
>>> looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
>>> resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has the
>>> legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML + JavaScript
is
>>> all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++ backend.
>>> There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
>>> Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately it
>>> isn't developed anymore.
>>>
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 6:32 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.

By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
on my Mac.

I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.

One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
"I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"

and

"I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"

The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.

Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.

Just my 2 cents.

And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
complexity.

Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
or elsewhere.

Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
thing at a time
(
The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn
)
to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
another.

I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
love Opal.

About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
them the illusion of freedom.

I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
enterprisey mentality.

For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.

JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
applications.

Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.

Cheers,

Andy

p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
and situation.

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>
> I meant to say
>
> JRuby is taking a long time to install
>
> LibUI does seem nice though
>
>
>
> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>>
>> LibUI does seem nice though
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:
>>>
>>> On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:
>>>
>>> > BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because it
>>> > is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
>>> > signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
>>> > maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem page:
>>> > qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>>> >
>>> > Cheers,
>>> >
>>> > Andy
>>>
>>> Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
>>> platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie. they
>>> don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or worse -
>>> I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing apps
but
>>> apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing - this
>>> mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).
>>>
>>> The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5 moved
>>> mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but syntactically
it
>>> looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
>>> resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has the
>>> legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML + JavaScript
is
>>> all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++ backend.
>>> There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
>>> Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately it
>>> isn't developed anymore.
>>>
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

In the goal of completeness, look at these two pages on my site

https://ethicify.online/i

https://ethicify.online/index2.html

I realise that the second page might make some people mad, but so be it!

···

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 8:33 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Andy

OK

So I made a desktop GUI application that is going to help with
documentation!

Kind of hard core, right?

But that might be necessary.

It works on Windows and Linux for sure, and Mac too

It's in the current gem

So people could be immeresed in MY platform

As for religion, we could talk about that kind of stuff in person.

I would like to meet you.

Thank you for the validation about C+= 2

In the aim of completeness, I also must acknowledge the existence of the
Ring programming language

Ring, Crystal and C += 2 all have really good syntax.

> I know JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it
is a
big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
love Opal.

This is freaking hilarious.

I know like 13 or so programming languages, but I never learned Java.

Javascript is like an extension of Java's badness.

You really need to add GTK bindings to your great project. I couldn't even
install the SWT gem!

Not to mention, the startup time of jruby is really a lot. It takes like
2.2 seconds to run a do-nothing ruby command on my quad-core Mac.

> About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
them the illusion of freedom.

I'm afraid that people can't do this anymore. To be a competent member of
a democracy, people need to be technologically literate. People need to
take smart actions and not be vulnerable to things. Not everyone needs to
be a programmer, but people cannot be vulnerable.

Religion is the most important part of my life, but that is complex.

> I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
enterprisey mentality.

This is not my target audience.

I can't have good conversations with programmers.

I did have an enterprisey mentality, got an investor, rejected him. He was
willing to invest tens of thousands of dollars with me, but he said that if
he was wasting my time, then I should tell him that.

I know how to earn millions of dollars with my skills fairly easily, but
I'm not pursuing that course of action because that would make me feel more
lonely.

If you have a job for me that would make me feel "more together", I could
work for you or someone else.

I don't have a formal Comp. Sci. background and I am not familiar with
Rails

I know

* C
* C++
* Bash
* D
* Python
* Ruby
* Some Perl
* Some Php
* Crystal
* Assembly Language
* HTML
* CSS
* Javascript
* Some awk
* My own langauge C += 2

I know some libraries in those languages.

I got into programming when I was 13. I am 26 now. So I have been doing
programming loosely speaking for 13 years.

If someone wants to hire me for a project that would be easy and that
would help me to build a better resume, then OK.

I am "equipped" with useful UNIX tools that I have made, so that might
help my productivity.

I really don't need to worry about money.

All I need to care about it relationships.

I don't care if I get paid a bad wage.

I made some websites for people in the past, but not that many, but I did
make money from those.

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 6:32 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.

By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
on my Mac.

I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.

One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
"I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"

and

"I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"

The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.

Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.

Just my 2 cents.

And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
complexity.

Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
or elsewhere.

Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
thing at a time
(
The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn
)
to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
another.

I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
love Opal.

About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
them the illusion of freedom.

I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
enterprisey mentality.

For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.

JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
applications.

Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.

Cheers,

Andy

p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
and situation.

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> >> wrote:
>
> I meant to say
>
> JRuby is taking a long time to install
>
> LibUI does seem nice though
>
>
>
> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> >> wrote:
>>
>> LibUI does seem nice though
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:
>>>
>>> On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:
>>>
>>> > BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because
it
>>> > is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
>>> > signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
>>> > maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem
page:
>>> > qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>>> >
>>> > Cheers,
>>> >
>>> > Andy
>>>
>>> Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
>>> platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie. they
>>> don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or worse -
>>> I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing apps
but
>>> apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing - this
>>> mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).
>>>
>>> The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5 moved
>>> mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but syntactically
it
>>> looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
>>> resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has the
>>> legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML + JavaScript
is
>>> all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++ backend.
>>> There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
>>> Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately it
>>> isn't developed anymore.
>>>
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 6:32 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.

By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
on my Mac.

I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.

One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
"I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"

and

"I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"

The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.

Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.

Just my 2 cents.

And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
complexity.

Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
or elsewhere.

Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
thing at a time
(
The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn
)
to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
another.

I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
love Opal.

About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
them the illusion of freedom.

I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
enterprisey mentality.

For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.

JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
applications.

Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.

Cheers,

Andy

p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
and situation.

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> >> wrote:
>
> I meant to say
>
> JRuby is taking a long time to install
>
> LibUI does seem nice though
>
>
>
> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> >> wrote:
>>
>> LibUI does seem nice though
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:
>>>
>>> On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:
>>>
>>> > BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because
it
>>> > is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
>>> > signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
>>> > maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem
page:
>>> > qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>>> >
>>> > Cheers,
>>> >
>>> > Andy
>>>
>>> Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
>>> platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie. they
>>> don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or worse -
>>> I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing apps
but
>>> apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing - this
>>> mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).
>>>
>>> The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5 moved
>>> mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but syntactically
it
>>> looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
>>> resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has the
>>> legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML + JavaScript
is
>>> all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++ backend.
>>> There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
>>> Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately it
>>> isn't developed anymore.
>>>
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

". I couldn't even install the SWT gem!"

I'm a bit surprised you had this issue. One thing to note is you have
to be on JRuby not (C) Ruby when installing the gem.

Could you please report to me what error messages you might have
encountered that got in the way of installing the SWT gem
(glimmer-dsl-swt: GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-swt: Glimmer DSL for SWT (JRuby Desktop Development GUI Framework))?

I have a quad-core MacBook Pro too, and I know what you mean about
JRuby taking 2.5 seconds minimum to do anything. It is an unfortunate
trade-off to keep in mind when working with it, but the robustness and
solidity of SWT as well as having the option to take advantage of
countless Java libraries more than make up for it when building
enterprise apps that you only start once at the beginning of the day
and leave on all day. For apps that need to be started quickly or are
not for the enterprise, other options might be better like Glimmer DSL
for LibUI (GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-libui: Glimmer DSL for LibUI (Prerequisite-Free Ruby Desktop Development GUI Library - No need to pre-install any prerequisites. Just install the gem and have platform-independent GUI that just works)) or Glimmer
DSL for Tk (GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-tk: Glimmer DSL for Tk (MRI Ruby Desktop Development GUI Library)) since they
run on CRuby.

Cheers,

···

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 8:51 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

In the goal of completeness, look at these two pages on my site

Example of this new liberal goal! :)

Semantic Metadata

I realise that the second page might make some people mad, but so be it!

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 8:33 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Andy

OK

So I made a desktop GUI application that is going to help with documentation!

Kind of hard core, right?

But that might be necessary.

It works on Windows and Linux for sure, and Mac too

It's in the current gem

So people could be immeresed in MY platform

As for religion, we could talk about that kind of stuff in person.

I would like to meet you.

Thank you for the validation about C+= 2

In the aim of completeness, I also must acknowledge the existence of the Ring programming language

Ring, Crystal and C += 2 all have really good syntax.

> I know JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
love Opal.

This is freaking hilarious.

I know like 13 or so programming languages, but I never learned Java.

Javascript is like an extension of Java's badness.

You really need to add GTK bindings to your great project. I couldn't even install the SWT gem!

Not to mention, the startup time of jruby is really a lot. It takes like 2.2 seconds to run a do-nothing ruby command on my quad-core Mac.

> About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
them the illusion of freedom.

I'm afraid that people can't do this anymore. To be a competent member of a democracy, people need to be technologically literate. People need to take smart actions and not be vulnerable to things. Not everyone needs to be a programmer, but people cannot be vulnerable.

Religion is the most important part of my life, but that is complex.

> I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
enterprisey mentality.

This is not my target audience.

I can't have good conversations with programmers.

I did have an enterprisey mentality, got an investor, rejected him. He was willing to invest tens of thousands of dollars with me, but he said that if he was wasting my time, then I should tell him that.

I know how to earn millions of dollars with my skills fairly easily, but I'm not pursuing that course of action because that would make me feel more lonely.

If you have a job for me that would make me feel "more together", I could work for you or someone else.

I don't have a formal Comp. Sci. background and I am not familiar with Rails

I know

* C
* C++
* Bash
* D
* Python
* Ruby
* Some Perl
* Some Php
* Crystal
* Assembly Language
* HTML
* CSS
* Javascript
* Some awk
* My own langauge C += 2

I know some libraries in those languages.

I got into programming when I was 13. I am 26 now. So I have been doing programming loosely speaking for 13 years.

If someone wants to hire me for a project that would be easy and that would help me to build a better resume, then OK.

I am "equipped" with useful UNIX tools that I have made, so that might help my productivity.

I really don't need to worry about money.

All I need to care about it relationships.

I don't care if I get paid a bad wage.

I made some websites for people in the past, but not that many, but I did make money from those.

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 6:32 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.

By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
on my Mac.

I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.

One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
"I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"

and

"I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"

The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.

Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.

Just my 2 cents.

And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
complexity.

Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
or elsewhere.

Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
thing at a time
(The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn)
to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
another.

I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
love Opal.

About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
them the illusion of freedom.

I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
enterprisey mentality.

For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.

JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
applications.

Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.

Cheers,

Andy

p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
and situation.

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I meant to say
>
> JRuby is taking a long time to install
>
> LibUI does seem nice though
>
>
>
> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> LibUI does seem nice though
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:
>>>
>>> On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:
>>>
>>> > BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because it
>>> > is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
>>> > signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
>>> > maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem page:
>>> > qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>>> >
>>> > Cheers,
>>> >
>>> > Andy
>>>
>>> Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
>>> platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie. they
>>> don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or worse -
>>> I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing apps but
>>> apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing - this
>>> mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).
>>>
>>> The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5 moved
>>> mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but syntactically it
>>> looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
>>> resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has the
>>> legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML + JavaScript is
>>> all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++ backend.
>>> There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
>>> Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately it
>>> isn't developed anymore.
>>>
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 6:32 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.

By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
on my Mac.

I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.

One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
"I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"

and

"I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"

The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.

Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.

Just my 2 cents.

And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
complexity.

Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
or elsewhere.

Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
thing at a time
(The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn)
to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
another.

I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
love Opal.

About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
them the illusion of freedom.

I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
enterprisey mentality.

For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.

JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
applications.

Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.

Cheers,

Andy

p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
and situation.

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I meant to say
>
> JRuby is taking a long time to install
>
> LibUI does seem nice though
>
>
>
> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> LibUI does seem nice though
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:
>>>
>>> On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:
>>>
>>> > BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only because it
>>> > is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance on
>>> > signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
>>> > maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem page:
>>> > qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>>> >
>>> > Cheers,
>>> >
>>> > Andy
>>>
>>> Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
>>> platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie. they
>>> don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or worse -
>>> I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing apps but
>>> apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing - this
>>> mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).
>>>
>>> The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5 moved
>>> mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but syntactically it
>>> looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
>>> resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has the
>>> legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML + JavaScript is
>>> all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++ backend.
>>> There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
>>> Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately it
>>> isn't developed anymore.
>>>
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: http://www.github.com/AndyObtiva

Well, on my Mint machine, I couldn't install gtk3 either, though apt
install ruby-gtk3 works fine

a@a:~$ jruby glimmer
WARNING: An illegal reflective access operation has occurred
WARNING: Illegal reflective access by
jnr.posix.JavaLibCHelper$ReflectiveAccess to method
sun.nio.ch.SelChImpl.getFD()
WARNING: Please consider reporting this to the maintainers of
jnr.posix.JavaLibCHelper$ReflectiveAccess
WARNING: Use --illegal-access=warn to enable warnings of further illegal
reflective access operations
WARNING: All illegal access operations will be denied in a future release
LoadError: no such file to load -- glimmer-dsl-swt
  require at org/jruby/RubyKernel.java:956
  require at
/usr/share/jruby/lib/ruby/stdlib/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:55
   <main> at glimmer:2
a@a:~$ ruby glimmer
Traceback (most recent call last):
2: from glimmer:2:in `<main>'
1: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in
`require'
/usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in `require':
cannot load such file -- glimmer-dsl-swt (LoadError)
9: from glimmer:2:in `<main>'
8: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:156:in
`require'
7: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:168:in
`rescue in require'
6: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:168:in
`require'
5: from
/var/lib/gems/2.7.0/gems/glimmer-dsl-swt-4.21.0.1/lib/glimmer-dsl-swt.rb:46:in
`<top (required)>'
4: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in
`require'
3: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in
`require'
2: from
/var/lib/gems/2.7.0/gems/glimmer-dsl-swt-4.21.0.1/lib/glimmer/dsl/swt/dsl.rb:23:in
`<top (required)>'
1: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in
`require'
/usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in `require':
cannot load such file --
/var/lib/gems/2.7.0/gems/glimmer-dsl-swt-4.21.0.1/vendor/swt/linux/swt.jar
(LoadError)
a@a:~$ ^C
a@a:~$

···

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 11:05 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

". I couldn't even install the SWT gem!"

I'm a bit surprised you had this issue. One thing to note is you have
to be on JRuby not (C) Ruby when installing the gem.

Could you please report to me what error messages you might have
encountered that got in the way of installing the SWT gem
(glimmer-dsl-swt: GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-swt: Glimmer DSL for SWT (JRuby Desktop Development GUI Framework))?

I have a quad-core MacBook Pro too, and I know what you mean about
JRuby taking 2.5 seconds minimum to do anything. It is an unfortunate
trade-off to keep in mind when working with it, but the robustness and
solidity of SWT as well as having the option to take advantage of
countless Java libraries more than make up for it when building
enterprise apps that you only start once at the beginning of the day
and leave on all day. For apps that need to be started quickly or are
not for the enterprise, other options might be better like Glimmer DSL
for LibUI (GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-libui: Glimmer DSL for LibUI (Prerequisite-Free Ruby Desktop Development GUI Library - No need to pre-install any prerequisites. Just install the gem and have platform-independent GUI that just works)) or Glimmer
DSL for Tk (GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-tk: Glimmer DSL for Tk (MRI Ruby Desktop Development GUI Library)) since they
run on CRuby.

Cheers,

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 8:51 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>
> In the goal of completeness, look at these two pages on my site
>
> Example of this new liberal goal! :)
>
> Semantic Metadata
>
> I realise that the second page might make some people mad, but so be it!
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 8:33 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>>
>> Hi Andy
>>
>> OK
>>
>> So I made a desktop GUI application that is going to help with
documentation!
>>
>> Kind of hard core, right?
>>
>> But that might be necessary.
>>
>> It works on Windows and Linux for sure, and Mac too
>>
>> It's in the current gem
>>
>> So people could be immeresed in MY platform
>>
>> As for religion, we could talk about that kind of stuff in person.
>>
>> I would like to meet you.
>>
>> Thank you for the validation about C+= 2
>>
>> In the aim of completeness, I also must acknowledge the existence of
the Ring programming language
>>
>> Ring, Crystal and C += 2 all have really good syntax.
>>
>> > I know JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using
it is a
>> big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
>> planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
>> love Opal.
>>
>> This is freaking hilarious.
>>
>> I know like 13 or so programming languages, but I never learned Java.
>>
>> Javascript is like an extension of Java's badness.
>>
>> You really need to add GTK bindings to your great project. I couldn't
even install the SWT gem!
>>
>> Not to mention, the startup time of jruby is really a lot. It takes
like 2.2 seconds to run a do-nothing ruby command on my quad-core Mac.
>>
>> > About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
>> not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
>> even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
>> more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
>> superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
>> them the illusion of freedom.
>>
>> I'm afraid that people can't do this anymore. To be a competent member
of a democracy, people need to be technologically literate. People need to
take smart actions and not be vulnerable to things. Not everyone needs to
be a programmer, but people cannot be vulnerable.
>>
>> Religion is the most important part of my life, but that is complex.
>>
>>
>> > I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
>> only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
>> food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
>> enterprisey mentality.
>>
>>
>> This is not my target audience.
>>
>> I can't have good conversations with programmers.
>>
>> I did have an enterprisey mentality, got an investor, rejected him. He
was willing to invest tens of thousands of dollars with me, but he said
that if he was wasting my time, then I should tell him that.
>>
>>
>>
>> I know how to earn millions of dollars with my skills fairly easily,
but I'm not pursuing that course of action because that would make me feel
more lonely.
>>
>>
>> If you have a job for me that would make me feel "more together", I
could work for you or someone else.
>>
>> I don't have a formal Comp. Sci. background and I am not familiar with
Rails
>>
>> I know
>>
>> * C
>> * C++
>> * Bash
>> * D
>> * Python
>> * Ruby
>> * Some Perl
>> * Some Php
>> * Crystal
>> * Assembly Language
>> * HTML
>> * CSS
>> * Javascript
>> * Some awk
>> * My own langauge C += 2
>>
>> I know some libraries in those languages.
>>
>> I got into programming when I was 13. I am 26 now. So I have been doing
programming loosely speaking for 13 years.
>>
>> If someone wants to hire me for a project that would be easy and that
would help me to build a better resume, then OK.
>>
>> I am "equipped" with useful UNIX tools that I have made, so that might
help my productivity.
>>
>> I really don't need to worry about money.
>>
>> All I need to care about it relationships.
>>
>>
>> I don't care if I get paid a bad wage.
>>
>> I made some websites for people in the past, but not that many, but I
did make money from those.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 6:32 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
>>> earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.
>>>
>>> By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
>>> able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
>>> on my Mac.
>>>
>>> I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
>>> it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
>>> the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.
>>>
>>> One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
>>> "I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"
>>>
>>> and
>>>
>>> "I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"
>>>
>>> The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
>>> without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
>>> youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
>>> all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
>>> the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
>>> of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.
>>>
>>> Just my 2 cents.
>>>
>>> And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
>>> That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
>>> markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
>>> facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
>>> complexity.
>>>
>>> Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
>>> into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
>>> gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
>>> dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
>>> better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
>>> all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
>>> multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
>>> or elsewhere.
>>>
>>> Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
>>> thing at a time
>>> (
The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn
)
>>> to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
>>> another.
>>>
>>> I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
>>> assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
>>> JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
>>> big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
>>> planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
>>> love Opal.
>>>
>>> About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
>>> not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
>>> even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
>>> more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
>>> superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
>>> them the illusion of freedom.
>>>
>>> I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
>>> only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
>>> food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
>>> enterprisey mentality.
>>>
>>> For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
>>> software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
>>> capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
>>> fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
>>> of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
>>> of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
>>> meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
>>> going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.
>>>
>>> JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
>>> helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
>>> time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
>>> libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
>>> applications.
>>>
>>> Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>>
>>> Andy
>>>
>>> p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
>>> should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
>>> to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
>>> totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
>>> alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
>>> of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
>>> and situation.
>>>
>>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>>> >
>>> > I meant to say
>>> >
>>> > JRuby is taking a long time to install
>>> >
>>> > LibUI does seem nice though
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen < > gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> >>
>>> >> LibUI does seem nice though
>>> >>
>>> >> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:
>>> >>>
>>> >>> On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:
>>> >>>
>>> >>> > BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only
because it
>>> >>> > is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance
on
>>> >>> > signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
>>> >>> > maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem
page:
>>> >>> > qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > Cheers,
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > Andy
>>> >>>
>>> >>> Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
>>> >>> platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie.
they
>>> >>> don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or
worse -
>>> >>> I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing
apps but
>>> >>> apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing -
this
>>> >>> mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).
>>> >>>
>>> >>> The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5
moved
>>> >>> mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but
syntactically it
>>> >>> looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
>>> >>> resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has
the
>>> >>> legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML +
JavaScript is
>>> >>> all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++
backend.
>>> >>> There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
>>> >>> Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately
it
>>> >>> isn't developed anymore.
>>> >>>
>>> >>>
>>> >>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> >>> <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> > <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Andy Maleh
>>>
>>> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
>>> Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
>>> GitHub: AndyObtiva (Andy Maleh) · GitHub
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 6:32 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
>>> earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.
>>>
>>> By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
>>> able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
>>> on my Mac.
>>>
>>> I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
>>> it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
>>> the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.
>>>
>>> One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
>>> "I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"
>>>
>>> and
>>>
>>> "I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"
>>>
>>> The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
>>> without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
>>> youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
>>> all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
>>> the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
>>> of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.
>>>
>>> Just my 2 cents.
>>>
>>> And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
>>> That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
>>> markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
>>> facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
>>> complexity.
>>>
>>> Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
>>> into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
>>> gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
>>> dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
>>> better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
>>> all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
>>> multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
>>> or elsewhere.
>>>
>>> Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
>>> thing at a time
>>> (
The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn
)
>>> to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
>>> another.
>>>
>>> I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
>>> assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
>>> JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
>>> big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
>>> planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
>>> love Opal.
>>>
>>> About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
>>> not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
>>> even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
>>> more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
>>> superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
>>> them the illusion of freedom.
>>>
>>> I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
>>> only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
>>> food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
>>> enterprisey mentality.
>>>
>>> For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
>>> software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
>>> capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
>>> fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
>>> of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
>>> of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
>>> meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
>>> going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.
>>>
>>> JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
>>> helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
>>> time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
>>> libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
>>> applications.
>>>
>>> Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>>
>>> Andy
>>>
>>> p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
>>> should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
>>> to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
>>> totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
>>> alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
>>> of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
>>> and situation.
>>>
>>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:
>>> >
>>> > I meant to say
>>> >
>>> > JRuby is taking a long time to install
>>> >
>>> > LibUI does seem nice though
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen < > gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> >>
>>> >> LibUI does seem nice though
>>> >>
>>> >> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:
>>> >>>
>>> >>> On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:
>>> >>>
>>> >>> > BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only
because it
>>> >>> > is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their reliance
on
>>> >>> > signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
>>> >>> > maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem
page:
>>> >>> > qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > Cheers,
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > Andy
>>> >>>
>>> >>> Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
>>> >>> platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie.
they
>>> >>> don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or
worse -
>>> >>> I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing
apps but
>>> >>> apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing -
this
>>> >>> mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look native).
>>> >>>
>>> >>> The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5
moved
>>> >>> mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but
syntactically it
>>> >>> looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
>>> >>> resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has
the
>>> >>> legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML +
JavaScript is
>>> >>> all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++
backend.
>>> >>> There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part with
>>> >>> Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but unfortunately
it
>>> >>> isn't developed anymore.
>>> >>>
>>> >>>
>>> >>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> >>> <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> > <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Andy Maleh
>>>
>>> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
>>> Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
>>> GitHub: AndyObtiva (Andy Maleh) · GitHub
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <ruby-talk list: member options login page>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: AndyObtiva (Andy Maleh) · GitHub

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<ruby-talk list: member options login page>

Sorry, I should have done the ">" kind of response

···

On Thu, Oct 21, 2021 at 9:56 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

Well, on my Mint machine, I couldn't install gtk3 either, though apt
install ruby-gtk3 works fine

a@a:~$ jruby glimmer
WARNING: An illegal reflective access operation has occurred
WARNING: Illegal reflective access by
jnr.posix.JavaLibCHelper$ReflectiveAccess to method
sun.nio.ch.SelChImpl.getFD()
WARNING: Please consider reporting this to the maintainers of
jnr.posix.JavaLibCHelper$ReflectiveAccess
WARNING: Use --illegal-access=warn to enable warnings of further illegal
reflective access operations
WARNING: All illegal access operations will be denied in a future release
LoadError: no such file to load -- glimmer-dsl-swt
  require at org/jruby/RubyKernel.java:956
  require at
/usr/share/jruby/lib/ruby/stdlib/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:55
   <main> at glimmer:2
a@a:~$ ruby glimmer
Traceback (most recent call last):
2: from glimmer:2:in `<main>'
1: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in
`require'
/usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in `require':
cannot load such file -- glimmer-dsl-swt (LoadError)
9: from glimmer:2:in `<main>'
8: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:156:in
`require'
7: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:168:in
`rescue in require'
6: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:168:in
`require'
5: from
/var/lib/gems/2.7.0/gems/glimmer-dsl-swt-4.21.0.1/lib/glimmer-dsl-swt.rb:46:in
`<top (required)>'
4: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in
`require'
3: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in
`require'
2: from
/var/lib/gems/2.7.0/gems/glimmer-dsl-swt-4.21.0.1/lib/glimmer/dsl/swt/dsl.rb:23:in
`<top (required)>'
1: from /usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in
`require'
/usr/lib/ruby/2.7.0/rubygems/core_ext/kernel_require.rb:92:in `require':
cannot load such file --
/var/lib/gems/2.7.0/gems/glimmer-dsl-swt-4.21.0.1/vendor/swt/linux/swt.jar
(LoadError)
a@a:~$ ^C
a@a:~$

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 11:05 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:

". I couldn't even install the SWT gem!"

I'm a bit surprised you had this issue. One thing to note is you have
to be on JRuby not (C) Ruby when installing the gem.

Could you please report to me what error messages you might have
encountered that got in the way of installing the SWT gem
(glimmer-dsl-swt: GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-swt: Glimmer DSL for SWT (JRuby Desktop Development GUI Framework))?

I have a quad-core MacBook Pro too, and I know what you mean about
JRuby taking 2.5 seconds minimum to do anything. It is an unfortunate
trade-off to keep in mind when working with it, but the robustness and
solidity of SWT as well as having the option to take advantage of
countless Java libraries more than make up for it when building
enterprise apps that you only start once at the beginning of the day
and leave on all day. For apps that need to be started quickly or are
not for the enterprise, other options might be better like Glimmer DSL
for LibUI (GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-libui: Glimmer DSL for LibUI (Prerequisite-Free Ruby Desktop Development GUI Library - No need to pre-install any prerequisites. Just install the gem and have platform-independent GUI that just works)) or Glimmer
DSL for Tk (GitHub - AndyObtiva/glimmer-dsl-tk: Glimmer DSL for Tk (MRI Ruby Desktop Development GUI Library)) since they
run on CRuby.

Cheers,

On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 8:51 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> >> wrote:
>
> In the goal of completeness, look at these two pages on my site
>
> Example of this new liberal goal! :)
>
> Semantic Metadata
>
> I realise that the second page might make some people mad, but so be it!
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 8:33 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> >> wrote:
>>
>> Hi Andy
>>
>> OK
>>
>> So I made a desktop GUI application that is going to help with
documentation!
>>
>> Kind of hard core, right?
>>
>> But that might be necessary.
>>
>> It works on Windows and Linux for sure, and Mac too
>>
>> It's in the current gem
>>
>> So people could be immeresed in MY platform
>>
>> As for religion, we could talk about that kind of stuff in person.
>>
>> I would like to meet you.
>>
>> Thank you for the validation about C+= 2
>>
>> In the aim of completeness, I also must acknowledge the existence of
the Ring programming language
>>
>> Ring, Crystal and C += 2 all have really good syntax.
>>
>> > I know JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using
it is a
>> big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
>> planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
>> love Opal.
>>
>> This is freaking hilarious.
>>
>> I know like 13 or so programming languages, but I never learned Java.
>>
>> Javascript is like an extension of Java's badness.
>>
>> You really need to add GTK bindings to your great project. I couldn't
even install the SWT gem!
>>
>> Not to mention, the startup time of jruby is really a lot. It takes
like 2.2 seconds to run a do-nothing ruby command on my quad-core Mac.
>>
>> > About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact
that
>> not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
>> even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
>> more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
>> superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
>> them the illusion of freedom.
>>
>> I'm afraid that people can't do this anymore. To be a competent member
of a democracy, people need to be technologically literate. People need to
take smart actions and not be vulnerable to things. Not everyone needs to
be a programmer, but people cannot be vulnerable.
>>
>> Religion is the most important part of my life, but that is complex.
>>
>>
>> > I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
>> only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
>> food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
>> enterprisey mentality.
>>
>>
>> This is not my target audience.
>>
>> I can't have good conversations with programmers.
>>
>> I did have an enterprisey mentality, got an investor, rejected him. He
was willing to invest tens of thousands of dollars with me, but he said
that if he was wasting my time, then I should tell him that.
>>
>>
>>
>> I know how to earn millions of dollars with my skills fairly easily,
but I'm not pursuing that course of action because that would make me feel
more lonely.
>>
>>
>> If you have a job for me that would make me feel "more together", I
could work for you or someone else.
>>
>> I don't have a formal Comp. Sci. background and I am not familiar with
Rails
>>
>> I know
>>
>> * C
>> * C++
>> * Bash
>> * D
>> * Python
>> * Ruby
>> * Some Perl
>> * Some Php
>> * Crystal
>> * Assembly Language
>> * HTML
>> * CSS
>> * Javascript
>> * Some awk
>> * My own langauge C += 2
>>
>> I know some libraries in those languages.
>>
>> I got into programming when I was 13. I am 26 now. So I have been
doing programming loosely speaking for 13 years.
>>
>> If someone wants to hire me for a project that would be easy and that
would help me to build a better resume, then OK.
>>
>> I am "equipped" with useful UNIX tools that I have made, so that might
help my productivity.
>>
>> I really don't need to worry about money.
>>
>> All I need to care about it relationships.
>>
>>
>> I don't care if I get paid a bad wage.
>>
>> I made some websites for people in the past, but not that many, but I
did make money from those.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 6:32 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
>>> earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.
>>>
>>> By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
>>> able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
>>> on my Mac.
>>>
>>> I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
>>> it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
>>> the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.
>>>
>>> One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
>>> "I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"
>>>
>>> and
>>>
>>> "I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"
>>>
>>> The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
>>> without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
>>> youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
>>> all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
>>> the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
>>> of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.
>>>
>>> Just my 2 cents.
>>>
>>> And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
>>> That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
>>> markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
>>> facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
>>> complexity.
>>>
>>> Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
>>> into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
>>> gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
>>> dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
>>> better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
>>> all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
>>> multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
>>> or elsewhere.
>>>
>>> Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
>>> thing at a time
>>> (
The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn
)
>>> to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
>>> another.
>>>
>>> I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
>>> assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
>>> JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
>>> big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
>>> planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
>>> love Opal.
>>>
>>> About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
>>> not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
>>> even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
>>> more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
>>> superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
>>> them the illusion of freedom.
>>>
>>> I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
>>> only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
>>> food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
>>> enterprisey mentality.
>>>
>>> For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
>>> software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
>>> capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
>>> fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
>>> of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
>>> of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
>>> meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
>>> going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.
>>>
>>> JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
>>> helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
>>> time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
>>> libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
>>> applications.
>>>
>>> Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>>
>>> Andy
>>>
>>> p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
>>> should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
>>> to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
>>> totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
>>> alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
>>> of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
>>> and situation.
>>>
>>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen < >> gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > I meant to say
>>> >
>>> > JRuby is taking a long time to install
>>> >
>>> > LibUI does seem nice though
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen < >> gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> >>
>>> >> LibUI does seem nice though
>>> >>
>>> >> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:
>>> >>>
>>> >>> On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:
>>> >>>
>>> >>> > BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only
because it
>>> >>> > is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their
reliance on
>>> >>> > signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
>>> >>> > maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem
page:
>>> >>> > qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > Cheers,
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > Andy
>>> >>>
>>> >>> Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
>>> >>> platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie.
they
>>> >>> don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or
worse -
>>> >>> I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing
apps but
>>> >>> apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing -
this
>>> >>> mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look
native).
>>> >>>
>>> >>> The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5
moved
>>> >>> mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but
syntactically it
>>> >>> looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
>>> >>> resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has
the
>>> >>> legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML +
JavaScript is
>>> >>> all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++
backend.
>>> >>> There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part
with
>>> >>> Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but
unfortunately it
>>> >>> isn't developed anymore.
>>> >>>
>>> >>>
>>> >>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> >>> <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> > <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Andy Maleh
>>>
>>> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
>>> Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
>>> GitHub: AndyObtiva (Andy Maleh) · GitHub
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 6:32 PM Andy Maleh <andy.am@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Gregory Cohen, thank you for the kind words about my projects in an
>>> earlier message. I missed them before. I just read them now.
>>>
>>> By the way, I took a look at democracy. It's got a lot of tools. I was
>>> able to run the pure Ruby scripts, but not the C++ (or Crystal) stuff
>>> on my Mac.
>>>
>>> I just got a chance to toy with https://ethicify.online/ and noticed
>>> it recognizes any word I say on the microphone, and then types it in
>>> the browser window. It was accurate and reliable enough.
>>>
>>> One thing that caught my attention was reading statements like these:
>>> "I have created 57 freedom oriented programs"
>>>
>>> and
>>>
>>> "I made 61 YouTube videos of my software"
>>>
>>> The issue with these statements is you only mention what you have done
>>> without enumerating all your projects (or providing links, like for
>>> youtube) in the README and documenting them in full details.
>>>
>>> Unfortunately, undocumented software is like having no software at
>>> all. If it's not documented, people won't use it. Very few people have
>>> the patience to dig into a gem's content to learn what it does instead
>>> of simply reading documentation of it on GitHub or a project page.
>>>
>>> Just my 2 cents.
>>>
>>> And perhaps, you have some documentation, but it's too disorganized.
>>> That is also like not having documentation at all. Paragraphs and
>>> markdown tags (## subheader, ### subsubheader, etc...) greatly
>>> facilitate management of information and enable dividing/conquering
>>> complexity.
>>>
>>> Also, since you have multiple projects, you might want to divide up
>>> into multiple gems (instead of mixing everything unrelated in one
>>> gem), and then have the democracy gem reference all other gems as
>>> dependencies if it made sense. But, to be honest, democracy might be
>>> better as a WIKI page, not a gem. After all, those projects are not
>>> all in Ruby, so it would make better sense to divy them up into
>>> multiple GitHub projects and document all on some WIKI page on GitHub
>>> or elsewhere.
>>>
>>> Also, it's a good idea to follow Kanban's recommendation of doing one
>>> thing at a time
>>> (
The power of doing only one thing at a time - Emergn
)
>>> to achieve significant value in one project before moving on to
>>> another.
>>>
>>> I could help with Ruby stuff, but not C++, Crystal, or Python (I'm
>>> assuming you invented the C+=2 language... that's cool). I know
>>> JavaScript well, but don't like working in it. I think using it is a
>>> big waste of time for everyone who uses it and is a big drain on the
>>> planet's collective software engineering energy. That's why I also
>>> love Opal.
>>>
>>> About your mission of offering freedom, you must respect the fact that
>>> not everybody is a software engineer, a developer, a programmer, or
>>> even remotely interested in computers at all. Some people feel a lot
>>> more free by never touching a computer, or think computer freedom is
>>> superficial or a catch-22 that ensnares more of their time to give
>>> them the illusion of freedom.
>>>
>>> I think you should focus your target audience on software engineers
>>> only, and respect the fact that people do need to make money to get
>>> food and pay living expenses, so it is important to have some form of
>>> enterprisey mentality.
>>>
>>> For example, although I offer Glimmer for free as open-source
>>> software, part of the reason is also that corporations could
>>> capitalize on it by being able to build desktop GUI applications in a
>>> fraction of the time it takes without Glimmer (like one month instead
>>> of 6, one week instead of 4, one day instead of 7, or one hour instead
>>> of a day). In other words, it is a profit multiplier that enables
>>> meeting business sales goals in a fraction of the cost. Maintenance
>>> going forward is even cheaper and quicker too.
>>>
>>> JRuby is a great example/role-model for.being an open-source tool that
>>> helps freedom, but also serves people's monetary interests at the same
>>> time by enabling them to leverage Java Virtual Machine robust
>>> libraries from Ruby to enable higher and quicker productivity of
>>> applications.
>>>
>>> Anyways, just my 2 cents and some food for thought.
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>>
>>> Andy
>>>
>>> p.s. By the way, if you feel lonely, and you're a Christian, you
>>> should make sure to attend church regularly. If you're a Jew, then go
>>> to the synagogue. Don't be shy or intimidated. Religious affiliations
>>> totally annihilate loneliness, making it impossible even when you are
>>> alone. I don't talk about religion usually. That was just a rare piece
>>> of advice that I felt was necessary given your difficult background
>>> and situation.
>>>
>>> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:07 PM Gregory Cohen < >> gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > I meant to say
>>> >
>>> > JRuby is taking a long time to install
>>> >
>>> > LibUI does seem nice though
>>> >
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 2:04 PM Gregory Cohen < >> gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> >>
>>> >> LibUI does seem nice though
>>> >>
>>> >> On Wed, Oct 20, 2021 at 1:18 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:
>>> >>>
>>> >>> On 10/20/21 18:16, Andy Maleh wrote:
>>> >>>
>>> >>> > BTW, QT is probably the worst of all GUI toolkits not only
because it
>>> >>> > is not native and its APIs are idiosyncratic with their
reliance on
>>> >>> > signals from what I heard, but also because it stopped getting
>>> >>> > maintained for Ruby around 2018 (as you can see in the Ruby gem
page:
>>> >>> > qtbindings | RubyGems.org | your community gem host)
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > Cheers,
>>> >>> >
>>> >>> > Andy
>>> >>>
>>> >>> Qt is native for some platforms like KDE or Sailfish OS. For other
>>> >>> platforms, the applications adapt by applying native themes (ie.
they
>>> >>> don't dispatch rendering, but just theme things, for better or
worse -
>>> >>> I'm using GNOME on Wayland and there are problems with resizing
apps but
>>> >>> apparently on X11 this doesn't happen, some icons are missing -
this
>>> >>> mostly applies to KDE apps, but otherwise they mostly look
native).
>>> >>>
>>> >>> The Ruby binding support leaves a lot to desire, but also Qt 5
moved
>>> >>> mostly to QML, which is semantically close to HTML, but
syntactically it
>>> >>> looks like CSS and embeds JavaScript (to be honest, it very much
>>> >>> resembles the Glimmer DSL for designing interfaces). It still has
the
>>> >>> legacy API, but new applications use QML. In theory, QML +
JavaScript is
>>> >>> all you need, but in practice it's like a frontend to a C++
backend.
>>> >>> There is a more recent project, that replaces the backend part
with
>>> >>> Ruby: GitHub - seanchas116/ruby-qml: A QML / Qt Quick bindings for Ruby - but
unfortunately it
>>> >>> isn't developed anymore.
>>> >>>
>>> >>>
>>> >>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> >>> <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> > <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Andy Maleh
>>>
>>> LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
>>> Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
>>> GitHub: AndyObtiva (Andy Maleh) · GitHub
>>>
>>> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
>>> <ruby-talk list: member options login page>
>
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <ruby-talk list: member options login page>

--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
Blog: http://andymaleh.blogspot.com
GitHub: AndyObtiva (Andy Maleh) · GitHub

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