Solving logic problems with Ruby


(Victor Manuel Reyes Viloria) #1

Well, judging from the description of this book:

Book Description
When the man Niobe loved was shot, she learned that she had
been the target, in a devious plot of the Devil’s. Hoping for revenge, she
discovered, too late, how intricate his scheming was,
and that he had managed to trap her son and her
granddaughter, Luna. Niobe’s only chance to save them was to accept a
challenge by the Prince of Deceit–a challenge to be decided in Hell
and in a maze of Satan’s devising!

I am not sure how much it goes into logic. However, the book appears to be
fascinating and I just ordered it from Amazon. The reviewers also gave it
high marks.

Thank you.

Victor

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> Stefan Schmiedl |
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> 06/04/2002 04:19 |
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To: ruby-talk@ruby-lang.org (ruby-talk ML) |
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Subject: Re: Solving logic problems with Ruby |
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During my college days I experimented with a language called Prolog.
This language was suitable to solve logic problems.
Had anybody used Ruby to solve logic problems?

For example, a problem like the one below:

You have 12 bricks. They look and feel exactly the same
but one is different than the other 11. It is either slightly
heavier or slightly lighter. Using a balance scale, find
the odd brick and tell whether it is lighter or heavier than
a normal brick. Oh yes, I almost forgot to tell you. You
can only use the scale 3 times.

Thank you

Not that I venture a solution here, but you might
also want to read Piers Anthony’s “With a Tangled Skein”,
especially the last sections :slight_smile:

s.

···

On Tue, 04 Jun 2002 20:07:27 GMT, Victor Manuel Reyes Viloria vmreyes@us.ibm.com wrote:


(Rick Rezinas) #2

I believe that is a later book in a series, the first of which is On a
Pale Horse, which I recall enjoying very much. He does get into some
interesting ideas in there, but it is certainly not a study on logic.

rick

···

Victor Manuel Reyes Viloria (vmreyes@us.ibm.com) wrote:

I am not sure how much it goes into logic. However, the book appears to be
fascinating and I just ordered it from Amazon. The reviewers also gave it
high marks.

Thank you.

Victor


(Kirk Haines) #3

I am not sure how much it goes into logic. However, the book appears to
be fascinating and I just ordered it from Amazon. The reviewers also
gave it high marks.

A variation on the brick puzzle that you put forward, using coins instead
of bricks, plays into the story.

Kirk Haines


(Stefan Schmiedl) #4

I am not sure how much it goes into logic. However, the book appears to be
fascinating and I just ordered it from Amazon. The reviewers also gave it
high marks.

You might also want to get the other six books …
sorry, should have told you earlier that there were
more of them.

The series is about the Incarnations of Immortality
(Death, War, Time, Fate, Nature, Satan, God) and a
fascinating read if you are into fantasy.

Enjoy.

s.