Better UNIX

I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages of my
software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist yet.

I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.

For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the
1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there
could be thousands of more tools made.

Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:

Gregory

That’s quite the undertaking. It would kind of be nice to have easier tools, and more accessible ones. But you can’t create an OS in Ruby. At least, I doubt it. Maybe an overlay on top of other OS’, but still, that takes a lot of work, and a lot of people good at Ruby. :slight_smile:
Devin Prater
r.d.t.prater@gmail.com

Https://devinprater.flounder.online

···

On Oct 3, 2021, at 6:52 PM, Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages of my software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist yet.

I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.

For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the 1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there could be thousands of more tools made.

Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:

Gregory

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

There's great wisdom in the phrase "if it ain't broke don't fix it"

That said, you do realize people reimplement Unix tools all the time right?

···

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021, 4:55 PM Devin Prater <r.d.t.prater@gmail.com> wrote:

That’s quite the undertaking. It would kind of be nice to have easier
tools, and more accessible ones. But you can’t create an OS in Ruby. At
least, I doubt it. Maybe an overlay on top of other OS’, but still, that
takes a lot of work, and a lot of people good at Ruby. :slight_smile:
Devin Prater
r.d.t.prater@gmail.com

Https://devinprater.flounder.online

On Oct 3, 2021, at 6:52 PM, Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages of my
software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist yet.

I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.

For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the
1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there
could be thousands of more tools made.

Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:

Gregory

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe
<ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
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I never said I would create an OS in Ruby.

I'm using C += 2 (my own language), C++, Crystal and Ruby

One more point, OS is such a weird term

Is GNU even an OS?

It's a collection of tools.

I have 57 or so working tools. No one can disagree with me on that, because
the tools exist.

Two other people have tried something similar

Most of the tools by others, with the exception of sponge, are quite
gimmicky

But doing sudo yum install moreutils doesn't hurt :slight_smile:

Also, an overlay is fine. There are two programs not by me. I include viu
and tracefile and include licenses

···

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 7:55 PM Devin Prater <r.d.t.prater@gmail.com> wrote:

That’s quite the undertaking. It would kind of be nice to have easier
tools, and more accessible ones. But you can’t create an OS in Ruby. At
least, I doubt it. Maybe an overlay on top of other OS’, but still, that
takes a lot of work, and a lot of people good at Ruby. :slight_smile:
Devin Prater
r.d.t.prater@gmail.com

Https://devinprater.flounder.online

On Oct 3, 2021, at 6:52 PM, Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages of my
software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist yet.

I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.

For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the
1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there
could be thousands of more tools made.

Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:

Gregory

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe
<ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

And they don't share them, therefore should be jailed :slight_smile:

···

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:07 PM Brandon Weaver <keystonelemur@gmail.com> wrote:

There's great wisdom in the phrase "if it ain't broke don't fix it"

That said, you do realize people reimplement Unix tools all the time
right?

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021, 4:55 PM Devin Prater <r.d.t.prater@gmail.com> wrote:

That’s quite the undertaking. It would kind of be nice to have easier
tools, and more accessible ones. But you can’t create an OS in Ruby. At
least, I doubt it. Maybe an overlay on top of other OS’, but still, that
takes a lot of work, and a lot of people good at Ruby. :slight_smile:
Devin Prater
r.d.t.prater@gmail.com

Https://devinprater.flounder.online

On Oct 3, 2021, at 6:52 PM, Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> >> wrote:

I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages of
my software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist yet.

I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.

For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the
1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there
could be thousands of more tools made.

Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:

Gregory

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe
<ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

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<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

I didn’t know about moreutils. That’s something I’ll look into when I get back to my Fedora system. But you did say Unix, which is an operating system. :slight_smile:
Devin Prater
r.d.t.prater@gmail.com

Https://devinprater.flounder.online

···

On Oct 3, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

I never said I would create an OS in Ruby.

I'm using C += 2 (my own language), C++, Crystal and Ruby

One more point, OS is such a weird term

Is GNU even an OS?

It's a collection of tools.

I have 57 or so working tools. No one can disagree with me on that, because the tools exist.

Two other people have tried something similar

Most of the tools by others, with the exception of sponge, are quite gimmicky

But doing sudo yum install moreutils doesn't hurt :slight_smile:

Also, an overlay is fine. There are two programs not by me. I include viu and tracefile and include licenses

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 7:55 PM Devin Prater <r.d.t.prater@gmail.com <mailto:r.d.t.prater@gmail.com>> wrote:
That’s quite the undertaking. It would kind of be nice to have easier tools, and more accessible ones. But you can’t create an OS in Ruby. At least, I doubt it. Maybe an overlay on top of other OS’, but still, that takes a lot of work, and a lot of people good at Ruby. :slight_smile:
Devin Prater
r.d.t.prater@gmail.com <mailto:r.d.t.prater@gmail.com>

Https://devinprater.flounder.online <https://devinprater.flounder.online/>

On Oct 3, 2021, at 6:52 PM, Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com <mailto:gregorycohen2@gmail.com>> wrote:

I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages of my software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist yet.

I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.

For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the 1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there could be thousands of more tools made.

Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:

Gregory

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

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I meant the UNIX philosophy

···

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:12 PM Devin Prater <r.d.t.prater@gmail.com> wrote:

I didn’t know about moreutils. That’s something I’ll look into when I get
back to my Fedora system. But you did say Unix, which is an operating
system. :slight_smile:
Devin Prater
r.d.t.prater@gmail.com

Https://devinprater.flounder.online

On Oct 3, 2021, at 7:07 PM, Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

I never said I would create an OS in Ruby.

I'm using C += 2 (my own language), C++, Crystal and Ruby

One more point, OS is such a weird term

Is GNU even an OS?

It's a collection of tools.

I have 57 or so working tools. No one can disagree with me on that,
because the tools exist.

Two other people have tried something similar

Most of the tools by others, with the exception of sponge, are quite
gimmicky

But doing sudo yum install moreutils doesn't hurt :slight_smile:

Also, an overlay is fine. There are two programs not by me. I include viu
and tracefile and include licenses

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 7:55 PM Devin Prater <r.d.t.prater@gmail.com> > wrote:

That’s quite the undertaking. It would kind of be nice to have easier
tools, and more accessible ones. But you can’t create an OS in Ruby. At
least, I doubt it. Maybe an overlay on top of other OS’, but still, that
takes a lot of work, and a lot of people good at Ruby. :slight_smile:
Devin Prater
r.d.t.prater@gmail.com

Https://devinprater.flounder.online
<https://devinprater.flounder.online/>

On Oct 3, 2021, at 6:52 PM, Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> >> wrote:

I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages of
my software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist yet.

I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.

For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the
1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there
could be thousands of more tools made.

Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:

Gregory

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe
<ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

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<ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>>
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Your idea of getting a better interface of a web browser is nice. The tabbed interface is hardly a good one IMO.

But maybe this will also inspire you:

It's a video presenting Eagle Mode. It's a program that uses a novel and experimental paradigm that gives you an infinite zoom interface, kind of like Google Maps. This program is basically a presentation that includes for instance a file manager, where you don't really open a file or directory, but zoom to it. It includes support for multitude of formats, like .pdf, .html, .zip, audio and video. It's a cool idea in my opinion and I think this may have some uses.

http://eaglemode.sourceforge.net/download.html

There is a Fedora package if you would like to try it.

···

On 10/4/21 1:52 AM, Gregory Cohen wrote:

I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages of my software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist yet.

I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.

For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the 1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there could be thousands of more tools made.

Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:

Gregory

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Wow!

Isn't this called a Zooming User Interface (a ZUI)?

I hadn't thought about this kind of thing since I was a kid (like 13 or so
years ago).

I'm going to try the program that you linked out! :slight_smile:

···

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:56 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:

Your idea of getting a better interface of a web browser is nice. The
tabbed interface is hardly a good one IMO.

But maybe this will also inspire you:

Eagle Mode - YouTube

It's a video presenting Eagle Mode. It's a program that uses a novel and
experimental paradigm that gives you an infinite zoom interface, kind of
like Google Maps. This program is basically a presentation that includes
for instance a file manager, where you don't really open a file or
directory, but zoom to it. It includes support for multitude of formats,
like .pdf, .html, .zip, audio and video. It's a cool idea in my opinion
and I think this may have some uses.

Eagle Mode - Download

There is a Fedora package if you would like to try it.

On 10/4/21 1:52 AM, Gregory Cohen wrote:
>
>
> I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages
> of my software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist
yet.
>
> I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.
>
> For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the
> 1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there
> could be thousands of more tools made.
>
> Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:
>
>
> Gregory
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

13 years is half my life

···

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 9:15 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

Wow!

Isn't this called a Zooming User Interface (a ZUI)?

I hadn't thought about this kind of thing since I was a kid (like 13 or so
years ago).

I'm going to try the program that you linked out! :slight_smile:

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:56 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:

Your idea of getting a better interface of a web browser is nice. The
tabbed interface is hardly a good one IMO.

But maybe this will also inspire you:

Eagle Mode - YouTube

It's a video presenting Eagle Mode. It's a program that uses a novel and
experimental paradigm that gives you an infinite zoom interface, kind of
like Google Maps. This program is basically a presentation that includes
for instance a file manager, where you don't really open a file or
directory, but zoom to it. It includes support for multitude of formats,
like .pdf, .html, .zip, audio and video. It's a cool idea in my opinion
and I think this may have some uses.

Eagle Mode - Download

There is a Fedora package if you would like to try it.

On 10/4/21 1:52 AM, Gregory Cohen wrote:
>
>
> I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages
> of my software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist
yet.
>
> I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.
>
> For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the
> 1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there
> could be thousands of more tools made.
>
> Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:
>
>
> Gregory
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

I've never used software like this before.

I had heard about Zooming User Interfaces when I was 13 or 14

···

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 9:15 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

13 years is half my life

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 9:15 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:

Wow!

Isn't this called a Zooming User Interface (a ZUI)?

I hadn't thought about this kind of thing since I was a kid (like 13 or
so years ago).

I'm going to try the program that you linked out! :slight_smile:

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:56 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:

Your idea of getting a better interface of a web browser is nice. The
tabbed interface is hardly a good one IMO.

But maybe this will also inspire you:

Eagle Mode - YouTube

It's a video presenting Eagle Mode. It's a program that uses a novel and
experimental paradigm that gives you an infinite zoom interface, kind of
like Google Maps. This program is basically a presentation that includes
for instance a file manager, where you don't really open a file or
directory, but zoom to it. It includes support for multitude of formats,
like .pdf, .html, .zip, audio and video. It's a cool idea in my opinion
and I think this may have some uses.

Eagle Mode - Download

There is a Fedora package if you would like to try it.

On 10/4/21 1:52 AM, Gregory Cohen wrote:
>
>
> I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages
> of my software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist
yet.
>
> I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.
>
> For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the
> 1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there
> could be thousands of more tools made.
>
> Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:
>
>
> Gregory
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Emerald-browser

Goals

Not bothersome (person shouldn't be bothered by anything)
Full control
To be fully written in C += 2

* Uses the same engine as Chrome, with QWebEngine

Ubuntu and fedora have packages

emerald-browser [number of terminals, default 1]

C += 2 compiler is called "g+". It's a wrapper for g++

Usage

g+ foo.cpp -O3 -Wall -Wextra -o foo

Example C += 2 program

···

---------------------------------------

main
puts("Hello world")

--------------------------------------

(No need for #includes)

g+ is written in Ruby. It could be ported to Crystal

TODO

1. Make g+ work better

It doesn't support classes, structs or namespaces currently

You can always #include C++ or C files though

C += 2 is, and always will be a PREPROCESSOR FOR MODERN C++. IT CAN DO
ANYTHING C++ CAN DO AND MORE.

Some things I want to implement

These should be a single unary option buton, like what GNOME 40 or Chrome
has.
In that, there should be many options. Maybe even things like Update System
There should be a close button for panes.
The source code should be tidied up, but please don't clutter it with too
much OOP.
Currently, everything gets googled. There could be a cache of some kind.
Everything you would want to do on your computer, should be doable in this
program. Currently, it makes a full-screen widget.

If there could be a Compiz cube for tabs, that would be really interesting.

There was a program that converted Chrome tabs to a filesystem extension.
Maybe something like this could be added.

Port to Mac.

Port to Windows??? No Terminal then

Port to FreeBSD

Would need to work for certain in X and Wayland

open should be improved

To open tabs, do

open [query1] [query2?]... (number of Google results per query to show in
panes)

Example

open 'ruby talk' 'ruby docs' 3

That would open 3 google results for ruby talk, and 3 google results for
ruby docs

googler is used to search Google.
Googler is used to search google. Googler is automatically installed.

Googler is written in python

* This browser should be as fast or faster than Chrome.

* Downloads don't currently work
* Fullscreen doesn't currently work
* Opening pages in new tabs doesn't currently work
* You currently can't close tabs, only open them
* The simplest way to close the browser currently is killall emerald-browser
* Add signal and slot to close program when window closes. This doesn't
currently happen.

Back and forward buttons should be added, somewhere.

Currently, you can right click, and do navigation

A way to type in addresses manually should be added.

Currently, you can do echo [full url] > /tmp/emerald-browser-fifo

Doing echo '/home/' > /tmp/emerald-browser-fifo should work

* Multiple instances needs to work

* Want installation to be super simple. Download a binary

* Let's get a fully functional browser, THEN care about packaging

If there could be a flip 3d for tabs, that would be cool

Does anyone know bcat? It's a Ruby program :slight_smile:

It's browser cat

One uses it like this

sudo yum upgrade | bcat

One sees the output in their browser

It's not my program

There's an interesting cover flow widget for Qt. Maybe that could be useful.

Some pictures






With Compiz


On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 9:19 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

I've never used software like this before.

I had heard about Zooming User Interfaces when I was 13 or 14

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 9:15 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> > wrote:

13 years is half my life

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 9:15 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> >> wrote:

Wow!

Isn't this called a Zooming User Interface (a ZUI)?

I hadn't thought about this kind of thing since I was a kid (like 13 or
so years ago).

I'm going to try the program that you linked out! :slight_smile:

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:56 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:

Your idea of getting a better interface of a web browser is nice. The
tabbed interface is hardly a good one IMO.

But maybe this will also inspire you:

Eagle Mode - YouTube

It's a video presenting Eagle Mode. It's a program that uses a novel
and
experimental paradigm that gives you an infinite zoom interface, kind
of
like Google Maps. This program is basically a presentation that
includes
for instance a file manager, where you don't really open a file or
directory, but zoom to it. It includes support for multitude of
formats,
like .pdf, .html, .zip, audio and video. It's a cool idea in my opinion
and I think this may have some uses.

Eagle Mode - Download

There is a Fedora package if you would like to try it.

On 10/4/21 1:52 AM, Gregory Cohen wrote:
>
>
> I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages
> of my software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist
yet.
>
> I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.
>
> For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the
> 1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and
there
> could be thousands of more tools made.
>
> Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:
>
>
> Gregory
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

I definitely have the mindset of fixing not just unix, but anything,
period. Everything must be going through a state of continuous
improvement all the time in my mind.

For example, I don't use "ls" and "cd" so much anymore as I now rely
on the TUI (Text-based User Interface) 'gdr' or simply 'gd' (go to
directory) found in this gem:

That project was attempting to fix all unix commands with Ruby
counterparts, but it hasn't moved much beyond that 'gd' command.
Still, I use it to move through all my directories fluidly. It's like
have that old Windows 3.1 and DOS tool: Norton Commander (not sure who
here is as old as me to know about it)

Andy

···

On Mon, Oct 4, 2021 at 12:36 AM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

Emerald-browser

Goals

Not bothersome (person shouldn't be bothered by anything)
Full control
To be fully written in C += 2

* Uses the same engine as Chrome, with QWebEngine

Ubuntu and fedora have packages

emerald-browser [number of terminals, default 1]

C += 2 compiler is called "g+". It's a wrapper for g++

Usage

g+ foo.cpp -O3 -Wall -Wextra -o foo

Example C += 2 program

---------------------------------------

main
puts("Hello world")

--------------------------------------

(No need for #includes)

g+ is written in Ruby. It could be ported to Crystal

TODO

1. Make g+ work better

It doesn't support classes, structs or namespaces currently

You can always #include C++ or C files though

C += 2 is, and always will be a PREPROCESSOR FOR MODERN C++. IT CAN DO ANYTHING C++ CAN DO AND MORE.

Some things I want to implement

These should be a single unary option buton, like what GNOME 40 or Chrome has.
In that, there should be many options. Maybe even things like Update System
There should be a close button for panes.
The source code should be tidied up, but please don't clutter it with too much OOP.
Currently, everything gets googled. There could be a cache of some kind.
Everything you would want to do on your computer, should be doable in this program. Currently, it makes a full-screen widget.

If there could be a Compiz cube for tabs, that would be really interesting.

There was a program that converted Chrome tabs to a filesystem extension. Maybe something like this could be added.

Port to Mac.

Port to Windows??? No Terminal then

Port to FreeBSD

Would need to work for certain in X and Wayland

open should be improved

To open tabs, do

open [query1] [query2?]... (number of Google results per query to show in panes)

Example

open 'ruby talk' 'ruby docs' 3

That would open 3 google results for ruby talk, and 3 google results for ruby docs

googler is used to search Google.
Googler is used to search google. Googler is automatically installed.

Googler is written in python

* This browser should be as fast or faster than Chrome.

* Downloads don't currently work
* Fullscreen doesn't currently work
* Opening pages in new tabs doesn't currently work
* You currently can't close tabs, only open them
* The simplest way to close the browser currently is killall emerald-browser
* Add signal and slot to close program when window closes. This doesn't currently happen.

Back and forward buttons should be added, somewhere.

Currently, you can right click, and do navigation

A way to type in addresses manually should be added.

Currently, you can do echo [full url] > /tmp/emerald-browser-fifo

Doing echo '/home/' > /tmp/emerald-browser-fifo should work

* Multiple instances needs to work

* Want installation to be super simple. Download a binary

* Let's get a fully functional browser, THEN care about packaging

If there could be a flip 3d for tabs, that would be cool

Does anyone know bcat? It's a Ruby program :slight_smile:

It's browser cat

One uses it like this

sudo yum upgrade | bcat

One sees the output in their browser

It's not my program

There's an interesting cover flow widget for Qt. Maybe that could be useful.

Some pictures

https://imgur.com/4vRpN9m.png
https://imgur.com/qKNkHxR.png
https://imgur.com/vBy9XnW.png
https://imgur.com/0zv6oSc.png
https://imgur.com/4vRpN9m.png
https://imgur.com/WRVB9X1.png

With Compiz

https://imgur.com/sTzNUm9.png
https://imgur.com/T9BeS0o.png

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 9:19 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

I've never used software like this before.

I had heard about Zooming User Interfaces when I was 13 or 14

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 9:15 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

13 years is half my life

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 9:15 PM Gregory Cohen <gregorycohen2@gmail.com> wrote:

Wow!

Isn't this called a Zooming User Interface (a ZUI)?

I hadn't thought about this kind of thing since I was a kid (like 13 or so years ago).

I'm going to try the program that you linked out! :slight_smile:

On Sun, Oct 3, 2021 at 8:56 PM hmdne <hmdne@airmail.cc> wrote:

Your idea of getting a better interface of a web browser is nice. The
tabbed interface is hardly a good one IMO.

But maybe this will also inspire you:

Eagle Mode - YouTube

It's a video presenting Eagle Mode. It's a program that uses a novel and
experimental paradigm that gives you an infinite zoom interface, kind of
like Google Maps. This program is basically a presentation that includes
for instance a file manager, where you don't really open a file or
directory, but zoom to it. It includes support for multitude of formats,
like .pdf, .html, .zip, audio and video. It's a cool idea in my opinion
and I think this may have some uses.

Eagle Mode - Download

There is a Fedora package if you would like to try it.

On 10/4/21 1:52 AM, Gregory Cohen wrote:
>
>
> I want to explicitly mention, inasmuch as I am in preliminary stages
> of my software creation, certain things, like unit tests, won't exist yet.
>
> I want to find people with the mindset of wanting to fix UNIX.
>
> For the love of God, why are people still using cludgy tools from the
> 1970s? Because they work? They do, but they are hard to use, and there
> could be thousands of more tools made.
>
> Discussions happen first, then READMEs :slight_smile:
>
>
> Gregory
>
> Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

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--
Andy Maleh

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andymaleh
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