A few newbie questions

You’re really going to like Ruby. :>
SciTE is simply a bundled editor that has some Ruby-smarts already built in. I don’t care for it personally, but it has some nice features (the ruby-smart folding is wonderful).
RubyWin is an MDI app that lets you quickly test/prototype Ruby code. I use it >a lot<. You can open up multiple windows, hit Ctrl-E to execute the code and get the results.
Tweak the code, try again, etc. It’s kind of like a GUI version of irb.

If you’re getting started, the PickAxe book is definitely the best place to start (at least it was for me).
An online version of it comes with the Windows ruby install (great for online help lookups). I’d recommend picking up a printed copy though.

···

-----Original Message-----
From: christopher.j.meisenzahl@citicorp.com
[mailto:christopher.j.meisenzahl@citicorp.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 14, 2002 12:22 PM
To: ruby-talk ML
Subject: A few newbie questions…

I just downloaded/installed Ruby on Win2K. I really like what I’ve seen so far.

A few questions.

I see that it comes with its own editor, SciTE. What exactly then is RubyWin?
Can I execute Ruby code from it? Can I write code there as well? What is the
purpose of these different pieces?

Any other tips for getting started with Ruby? I know C and I’ve done a little
PERL & AWK in the past.

Thanks very much,
Christopher

Christopher J. Meisenzahl CPS, CSTE
Senior Software Testing Consultant
Spherion
christopher.j.meisenzahl@citicorp.com

Bennett, Patrick wrote:

If you’re getting started, the PickAxe book is definitely the best place to start (at least it was for me).

Just to clarify (for Christopher): The “PickAxe Book” that people refer
to now and again is “Programming Ruby”, by Dave Thomas and Andy Hunt.
Patrick is correct that this is a must-have for beginning Ruby
programmers (and non-beginners, for that matter :wink:

Bennett, Patrick wrote:

If you’re getting started, the PickAxe book is definitely the
best place to start (at least it was for me).

Just to clarify (for Christopher): The “PickAxe Book” that people refer
to now and again is “Programming Ruby”, by Dave Thomas and Andy Hunt.
Patrick is correct that this is a must-have for beginning Ruby
programmers (and non-beginners, for that matter :wink:

Speaking of the “PickAxe Book”, how much is missing
from the on-line version? (I’ve noticed that a lot
of chapter 18 is not there.)

–alan

···
  • Subject: Re: A few newbie questions…:

Bennett, Patrick wrote:

If you’re getting started, the PickAxe book is definitely the
best place to start (at least it was for me).

Just to clarify (for Christopher): The “PickAxe Book” that people refer
to now and again is “Programming Ruby”, by Dave Thomas and Andy Hunt.
Patrick is correct that this is a must-have for beginning Ruby
programmers (and non-beginners, for that matter :wink:

Speaking of the “PickAxe Book”, how much is missing
from the on-line version? (I’ve noticed that a lot
of chapter 18 is not there.)

? I hadn’t noticed any major omissions.

It’s not crippleware, in other words.

I have noticed some annoying anti-features: No page
numbers, much less links to them; and even more
importantly, the figures seem to be missing.

But as for huge chunks of text missing: I wasn’t aware
of any, but I’ll go look.

I’ll be curious about what Dave says.

Hal

···

----- Original Message -----
From: “Alan F Lundin” aflundi@mailgate.sandia.gov
To: “ruby-talk ML” ruby-talk@ruby-lang.org;
ruby-talk@helium.ruby-lang.org
Sent: Wednesday, August 14, 2002 4:38 PM
Subject: Re: A few newbie questions…

“Alan F Lundin” aflundi@mailgate.sandia.gov writes:

Bennett, Patrick wrote:

If you’re getting started, the PickAxe book is definitely the
best place to start (at least it was for me).

Just to clarify (for Christopher): The “PickAxe Book” that people refer
to now and again is “Programming Ruby”, by Dave Thomas and Andy Hunt.
Patrick is correct that this is a must-have for beginning Ruby
programmers (and non-beginners, for that matter :wink:

Speaking of the “PickAxe Book”, how much is missing
from the on-line version? (I’ve noticed that a lot
of chapter 18 is not there.)

That’s a wee production problem: Ruby changed, and some of the sample
code no longer compiles. As the code gets compiled and executed every
time we format the book (because we wanted to make sure the code in
the book was accurate), the formatting stops at that point.

I need to go through and update the code, but to do that I also need
to get AWL to agree to a fairly large page change set at the next
printing.

Dave

Speaking of the “PickAxe Book”, how much is missing
from the on-line version? (I’ve noticed that a lot
of chapter 18 is not there.)

? I hadn’t noticed any major omissions.

It’s not crippleware, in other words.

I have noticed some annoying anti-features: No page
numbers, much less links to them; and even more
importantly, the figures seem to be missing.

But as for huge chunks of text missing: I wasn’t aware
of any, but I’ll go look.

I’ll be curious about what Dave says.

Hal

In defence of Dave/Andy/OnlinePickAxe, I have learned Ruby from the ground
up using Matz’s Ruby in a Nutshell (book), OnlinePickAxe, and ri
(astoundingly beautiful command-line reference into OnlinePickAxe
material). Like everyone else, I notice that OnlinePickAxe/ri "suffers"
from not being able to trace down page references or view figures, but
this is just not a big deal. I’m not sure why, but it’s just not a big
deal. I can always find the information I need, and that’s not because
I’m very experienced in Ruby - I’m not.

Given a free language with free third-party documentation, we’re doing
very well indeed.

Cheers,
Gavin

“Hal E. Fulton” wrote:

I have noticed some annoying anti-features: No page
numbers, much less links to them; and even more
importantly, the figures seem to be missing.

About the figures, did someone mention modifying the JPEGs from the free
german translation some time back? [
http://home.vr-web.de/juergen.katins/ruby/buch/ ]
Most of these are directly usable, and in the remainders the text can be
changed in any paint program (though the quality does suffer somewhat),
and I think you don’t have to go about changing all the XML documents.
(Some clever changes to convert.xsl and an extra XML document if you
want the figure captions should suffice, I think.) It is a bit of a
quick hack, and I’d like to have input from Jürgen Katins, before I give
out any modified files.

As for the page numbers/links, are you thinking:

  • display pagenumbers in HTML
  • links to each and every pagenumber
  • links to pagenumbers explicitly stated

The last of these three I am planning to add to the norwegian
translation, and I see that Katins have done so also. However, here I
see less chance of avoiding going into the XML. Since Dave and Andy use
the LaTeX as source to generate the XML, I’m not sure how to do this
without the solution being fragile. Most of the page references can be
reduced to chapter, section or sub[sub]section references. However, some
point more or less “into the middle” of things, which is more difficult
to make anchor names for, w/o going into the XML.

Just my 0.02 NOK

···


([ Kent Dahl ]/)_ ~ [ http://www.stud.ntnu.no/~kentda/ ]/~
))_student
/(( _d L b_/ NTNU - graduate engineering - 5. year )
( __õ|õ// ) )Industrial economics and technological management(
_
/ö____/ (_engineering.discipline=Computer::Technology)

In defence of Dave/Andy/OnlinePickAxe, I have learned Ruby from the ground
up using Matz’s Ruby in a Nutshell (book), OnlinePickAxe, and ri
(astoundingly beautiful command-line reference into OnlinePickAxe
material). Like everyone else, I notice that OnlinePickAxe/ri "suffers"
from not being able to trace down page references or view figures, but
this is just not a big deal. I’m not sure why, but it’s just not a big
deal. I can always find the information I need, and that’s not because
I’m very experienced in Ruby - I’m not.

Given a free language with free third-party documentation, we’re doing
very well indeed.

I’d also recommend the “search ruby-talk via Google groups” web form that
was posted here not too long ago.

James

···

Cheers,
Gavin

“Kent Dahl” schrieb:

“Hal E. Fulton” wrote:

I have noticed some annoying anti-features: No page
numbers, much less links to them; and even more
importantly, the figures seem to be missing.

About the figures, did someone mention modifying the JPEGs from the free
german translation some time back? [
http://home.vr-web.de/juergen.katins/ruby/buch/ ]
Most of these are directly usable, and in the remainders the text can be
changed in any paint program (though the quality does suffer somewhat),
and I think you don’t have to go about changing all the XML documents.
(Some clever changes to convert.xsl and an extra XML document if you
want the figure captions should suffice, I think.) It is a bit of a
quick hack, and I’d like to have input from Jürgen Katins, before I give
out any modified files.

I inserted links to the pictures into the xml files, and in convert.xsl I
used
an extra instruction for “img” then. It is included in
http://home.vr-web.de/juergen.katins/ruby/downloads/book.zip
You can see the results (in english language) at
http://home.vr-web.de/juergen.katins/ruby/book/index.html

As for the page numbers/links, are you thinking:

  • display pagenumbers in HTML
  • links to each and every pagenumber
  • links to pagenumbers explicitly stated

The last of these three I am planning to add to the norwegian
translation, and I see that Katins have done so also. However, here I
see less chance of avoiding going into the XML. Since Dave and Andy use
the LaTeX as source to generate the XML, I’m not sure how to do this
without the solution being fragile.

I would have been glad too if Dave and Andy had preserved the LaTex links
in the xml files. Instead I had to search the LaTex links in the LaTex files
and
compare the associated page numbers with the page numbers used in the
xml files (while counting paragraphs to better the hits). Then I replaced
the
page numbers in the xml files by xml tags. These tags were then
transformed into html links using some modifications on convert.xsl. It
has been a dirty hack and a really tricky undertaking and I hope
instead of transforming the LaTex links to page numbers Dave and
Andy will transfer them into neat xml tags some time in the
future.
Same goes for the links used for the index.
If someone is interested in the ruby scripts I used I could make
them available.

Juergen

IMHO, the online version of the PickAxe is most useful as a supplement
to a printed copy, if only because printed books are so darn handy. Go
down to B&N, Borders, amazon, where ever, buy the book and consider it
an investment…

Also IMHO, your 2nd Ruby book should be Hal Fulton’s The Ruby Way.

···

On Thu, 15 Aug 2002 02:27:37 GMT, “Gavin Sinclair” gsinclair@soyabean.com.au wrote:

In defence of Dave/Andy/OnlinePickAxe, I have learned Ruby from the ground
up using Matz’s Ruby in a Nutshell (book), OnlinePickAxe, and ri
(astoundingly beautiful command-line reference into OnlinePickAxe
material). Like everyone else, I notice that OnlinePickAxe/ri "suffers"
from not being able to trace down page references or view figures, but
this is just not a big deal. I’m not sure why, but it’s just not a big
deal. I can always find the information I need, and that’s not because
I’m very experienced in Ruby - I’m not.

Given a free language with free third-party documentation, we’re doing
very well indeed.

Cheers,
Gavin

" JamesBritt" james@jamesbritt.com writes:

I’d also recommend the “search ruby-talk via Google groups” web form that
was posted here not too long ago.

Available on the side menu of www.rubygarden.org

Dave