Interesting Perl Journal move

The Perl Journal is being reborn yet again. This time, it will be an
online monthly magazine with a $12/year subscription rate. They’re
looking for 3000 subscribers to move forward.

So, how does this affect the Ruby world? They mention taht they’re going
to be broadening their scope to handle other languages as well. If they
get a significant number of Ruby Subscribers (and potential writers), we
could find ourselves with a monthly outlet.

for more information (and a place to talk about this, see
http://use.perl.org/articles/02/09/12/026254.shtml?tid=9
or
http://www.tpj.com/

happy hacking,
-pate

The Perl Journal is being reborn yet again. This time, it will be an
online monthly magazine with a $12/year subscription rate. They’re
looking for 3000 subscribers to move forward.

So, how does this affect the Ruby world? They mention taht they’re going
to be broadening their scope to handle other languages as well. If they
get a significant number of Ruby Subscribers (and potential writers), we
could find ourselves with a monthly outlet.

I used to subscribe to TPJ, and was sad to see it subsumed by Sys Admin
magazine, and then disappear.

I would gladly pay $12 for the PDF version, particually if it can provide
another outlet for Ruby information.

James

I think we should start our own Ruby Developers Journal (RDP).

Can Dave put a voting ballot on this at RubyGarden and
we all vote just once to get a head count?

···

On Fri, Sep 13, 2002 at 01:44:18AM +0900, Pat Eyler wrote:

The Perl Journal is being reborn yet again. This time, it will be an
online monthly magazine with a $12/year subscription rate. They’re
looking for 3000 subscribers to move forward.

So, how does this affect the Ruby world? They mention taht they’re going
to be broadening their scope to handle other languages as well. If they
get a significant number of Ruby Subscribers (and potential writers), we
could find ourselves with a monthly outlet.

for more information (and a place to talk about this, see
http://use.perl.org/articles/02/09/12/026254.shtml?tid=9
or
http://www.tpj.com/

happy hacking,
-pate


Jim Freeze

Programming Ruby
def initialize; fun; end
A language with class

Pat Eyler wrote:

The Perl Journal is being reborn yet again. This time, it will be an
online monthly magazine with a $12/year subscription rate. They’re
looking for 3000 subscribers to move forward.

So, how does this affect the Ruby world? They mention taht they’re going
to be broadening their scope to handle other languages as well. If they
get a significant number of Ruby Subscribers (and potential writers), we
could find ourselves with a monthly outlet.

for more information (and a place to talk about this, see
http://use.perl.org/articles/02/09/12/026254.shtml?tid=9
or
http://www.tpj.com/

happy hacking,
-pate

I would gladly be “A” reviewer. But I insist on a Newbie section!!! :slight_smile:

agreed! unless perl journal is willing to alter it name to Script
Developers Journal os something general like that, i would fear ARuby
would ALAWAYS get a back billing.

···

On Thu, 2002-09-12 at 13:14, Jim Freeze wrote:

I think we should start our own Ruby Developers Journal (RDP).

Can Dave put a voting ballot on this at RubyGarden and
we all vote just once to get a head count?


tom sawyer, aka transami
transami@transami.net

Jim Freeze jim@freeze.org writes:

I think we should start our own Ruby Developers Journal (RDP).

Jim:

Are you volunteering to edit it?

Or a related question, would enough people subscribe so that we could pay enough
to support a low level publication. (server, editor, cc processing, etc)

  • alan
···

On Fri, Sep 13, 2002 at 04:31:18AM +0900, Dave Thomas wrote:

Jim Freeze jim@freeze.org writes:

I think we should start our own Ruby Developers Journal (RDP).

Jim:

Are you volunteering to edit it?


Alan Chen
Digikata LLC

Jim Freeze jim@freeze.org writes:

I think we should start our own Ruby Developers Journal (RDP).

Jim:

:slight_smile:

Are you volunteering to edit it?

8-o

Who, me? Hmm, let’s see, job, family,
ruby documentation project, ruby developers
journal…sure, no problem.

Depends on what you mean by edit.
If that means doing everything from soliciting
writers, type-setting, and proofing to printing,
then no.

If editing is interactive proof-reading, then
maybe. I’m sure we could get several reviewers
to sign up, however.

···

On Fri, Sep 13, 2002 at 04:31:18AM +0900, Dave Thomas wrote:


Jim Freeze

Programming Ruby
def initialize; fun; end
A language with class

agreed! unless perl journal is willing to alter it name to Script
Developers Journal os something general like that, i would fear ARuby
would ALAWAYS get a back billing.

Here’s a thought or two, something of a devil’s advocate argument:

If we push to get a noticeable share of TPJ (or whatever it ends up being
called), we bring Ruby to the attention of perlers, pythoners, and whomever
else. If we go off and do The Ruby Journal, while it would provide a useful
service, it would be preaching to the choir.

Writing and editing well are hard tasks. I’d rather see fewer, but
better, Ruby articles, and see them reach a larger audience, than have
something that may come off as a bit amateurish or inept, simply because of
the perceived slight of second billing.

James

Jim Freeze jim@freeze.org writes:

I think we should start our own Ruby Developers Journal (RDP).
Jim:
Are you volunteering to edit it?

8-o

Who, me? Hmm, let’s see, job, family,
ruby documentation project, ruby developers
journal…sure, no problem.

Depends on what you mean by edit.
If that means doing everything from soliciting
writers, type-setting, and proofing to printing,
then no.

If editing is interactive proof-reading, then
maybe. I’m sure we could get several reviewers
to sign up, however.

If you’re thinking about a ruby magazine, it might be worth looking at The
Perl Review. They’ve started an online magaizine, and are considering
taking it to print. There’s a fairly large community volunteering
(writing, reviewing, etc), which we’d need if we were to start a magazine
on our own …

It’s a big undertaking, and not one to go into without a good bit of
thought up front. Is it worth a BoF at RubyConf2002?

-pate

···

On Fri, 13 Sep 2002, Jim Freeze wrote:

On Fri, Sep 13, 2002 at 04:31:18AM +0900, Dave Thomas wrote:


Jim Freeze

Programming Ruby
def initialize; fun; end
A language with class

perhaps it be sort of a specialized wiki?

writers can receive private accounts to work-on/post their articles,
then when ready submit them to editorial review. if they pass they are
included in the next installment (bi-monthly?) of the public pages.
it would be possible to have a handful of peer-review editors instead of
just one, to spread out the work.

just a thought.

···

On Thu, 2002-09-12 at 13:45, Jim Freeze wrote:

8-o

Who, me? Hmm, let’s see, job, family,
ruby documentation project, ruby developers
journal…sure, no problem.

Depends on what you mean by edit.
If that means doing everything from soliciting
writers, type-setting, and proofing to printing,
then no.

If editing is interactive proof-reading, then
maybe. I’m sure we could get several reviewers
to sign up, however.


tom sawyer, aka transami
transami@transami.net

[…]

Are you volunteering to edit it?

8-o

Who, me? Hmm, let’s see, job, family,
ruby documentation project, ruby developers
journal…sure, no problem.

Depends on what you mean by edit.
If that means doing everything from soliciting
writers, type-setting, and proofing to printing,
then no.

If editing is interactive proof-reading, then
maybe. I’m sure we could get several reviewers
to sign up, however.

You might want to see how brian d foy is doing at the Perl Review -
http://www.theperlreview.com/ as he has real world experience of getting
that done.

One benefit of piggy-backing on the Perl journal is that you might pique
quite a few people’s interest, and you get a chance to see how much Ruby
specific content is likely to be generated.

Mike

···

In article 20020912154544.A2533@freeze.org, Jim Freeze wrote:

On Fri, Sep 13, 2002 at 04:31:18AM +0900, Dave Thomas wrote:


mike@stok.co.uk | The “`Stok’ disclaimers” apply.
http://www.stok.co.uk/~mike/ | GPG PGP Key 1024D/059913DA
mike@exegenix.com | Fingerprint 0570 71CD 6790 7C28 3D60
http://www.exegenix.com/ | 75D2 9EC4 C1C0 0599 13DA

agreed! unless perl journal is willing to alter it name to Script
Developers Journal os something general like that, i would fear ARuby
would ALAWAYS get a back billing.

Here’s a thought or two, something of a devil’s advocate argument:

If we push to get a noticeable share of TPJ (or whatever it ends up being
called), we bring Ruby to the attention of perlers, pythoners, and whomever
else. If we go off and do The Ruby Journal, while it would provide a useful
service, it would be preaching to the choir.

I’m not sure I understand what you mean here. I don’t think that
the Linux journal is preaching to the choir, or that the
C++ journal is preaching to the choir. Why would a ruby journal
be preaching to the choir?

Writing and editing well are hard tasks. I’d rather see fewer, but
better, Ruby articles, and see them reach a larger audience, than have
something that may come off as a bit amateurish or inept, simply because of
the perceived slight of second billing.

I think peer review could control that.
I have seen the work and calibre of people on this list.
I have no doubt that there is sufficient talent to
produce a journal of 3-6 articles every 2 months.

Jim

···

On Fri, Sep 13, 2002 at 06:33:42AM +0900, JamesBritt wrote:


Jim Freeze

Programming Ruby
def initialize; fun; end
A language with class

Before giving up on this, why not get some people to commit through the
mailing list. There are more than
enough qualified individuals who participate on this mailing list.

···

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Sawyer [mailto:transami@transami.net]
Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2002 2:10 PM
To: ruby-talk ML
Subject: Re: interesting Perl Journal move

On Thu, 2002-09-12 at 13:45, Jim Freeze wrote:

8-o

Who, me? Hmm, let’s see, job, family,
ruby documentation project, ruby developers
journal…sure, no problem.

Depends on what you mean by edit.
If that means doing everything from soliciting
writers, type-setting, and proofing to printing,
then no.

If editing is interactive proof-reading, then
maybe. I’m sure we could get several reviewers
to sign up, however.

perhaps it be sort of a specialized wiki?

writers can receive private accounts to work-on/post their articles,
then when ready submit them to editorial review. if they pass they are
included in the next installment (bi-monthly?) of the public pages.
it would be possible to have a handful of peer-review editors instead of
just one, to spread out the work.

just a thought.


tom sawyer, aka transami
transami@transami.net

I’m not sure I understand what you mean here. I don’t think that
the Linux journal is preaching to the choir, or that the
C++ journal is preaching to the choir. Why would a ruby journal
be preaching to the choir?

If you do not already use Linux or C++ it is unlikely you will be reading
those magazines. On the other hand, if you read Dr. Dobbs you will at least
see references to things that don’t hit your radar in day-to-day life.

(And both Linux Magazine and Linux Journal contain a bit too many churlish
snipes at “Micro$soft” and “Windoze”, creating the impression that they are
targeting a self-selective clique. I doubt that’s an explicit editorial
policy, but more of a side-effect of closed-culture inbreeding.)

If you do not use language Foo, are you likely to be a reader of The Foo
Journal?

Writing and editing well are hard tasks. I’d rather see fewer, but
better, Ruby articles, and see them reach a larger audience, than have
something that may come off as a bit amateurish or inept,
simply because of
the perceived slight of second billing.

I think peer review could control that.
I have seen the work and calibre of people on this list.
I have no doubt that there is sufficient talent to
produce a journal of 3-6 articles every 2 months.

Possibly.

James

···

Jim


Jim Freeze

Programming Ruby
def initialize; fun; end
A language with class

I just looked at September’s Perl Review, and on the front page it says:

We would like to get articles or “Short Notes” on:

* Perl & Ruby

...

That looks like an invitation to me :slight_smile:

Mike

···

In article slrnao20od.e95.mike@ratdog.stok.co.uk, Mike Stok wrote:

You might want to see how brian d foy is doing at the Perl Review -
http://www.theperlreview.com/ as he has real world experience of getting
that done.


mike@stok.co.uk | The “`Stok’ disclaimers” apply.
http://www.stok.co.uk/~mike/ | GPG PGP Key 1024D/059913DA
mike@exegenix.com | Fingerprint 0570 71CD 6790 7C28 3D60
http://www.exegenix.com/ | 75D2 9EC4 C1C0 0599 13DA

Hi –

If you’re thinking about a ruby magazine, it might be worth looking at The
Perl Review. They’ve started an online magaizine, and are considering
taking it to print. There’s a fairly large community volunteering
(writing, reviewing, etc), which we’d need if we were to start a magazine
on our own …

It’s a big undertaking, and not one to go into without a good bit of
thought up front. Is it worth a BoF at RubyConf2002?

You could plan on setting up an Open Space event on this topic.

Also, imaginably the papers at the conference could seed a first issue
or two of a journal.

David

P.S. Speaking of the conference >>>>>>>>>>>>>\
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
vvvvvvvvv
vvvvvvv
vvvvv
vvv
– v

David Alan Black | Register for RubyConf 2002!
home: dblack@candle.superlink.net | November 1-3
work: blackdav@shu.edu | Seattle, WA, USA
Web: http://pirate.shu.edu/~blackdav | http://www.rubyconf.com

···

On Fri, 13 Sep 2002, Pat Eyler wrote:

Ok, I see. My original intent for a Ruby journal would be as a resource
for Ruby programmers. I don’t see tagging along with the TDP to
be a fruitful endeavor in Ruby advocacy, but maybe I am just
not up-to-date with TDP.

However, I think that a good RDP could also be a good advocate.

Jim

···

On Fri, Sep 13, 2002 at 08:18:45AM +0900, JamesBritt wrote:

I’m not sure I understand what you mean here. I don’t think that
the Linux journal is preaching to the choir, or that the
C++ journal is preaching to the choir. Why would a ruby journal
be preaching to the choir?

If you do not already use Linux or C++ it is unlikely you will be reading
those magazines. On the other hand, if you read Dr. Dobbs you will at least
see references to things that don’t hit your radar in day-to-day life.


Jim Freeze

Programming Ruby
def initialize; fun; end
A language with class

What I’d like to see is a journal like Dr. Dobbs without so much Microsoft
and Java, a magazine with some good features (on a theme) and then a Perl
column, a Ruby column, a Python column, a language of the month column,
and a general CSci column (algorithms or whatever)-- a heavy focus on
scripting languages as opposed to C(++)/Java and general computing.

It might be kind of fun if the theme of the first issue were “desktop
publishing and scripting languages”… suggested articles: how to use a
scripting language library to create a postscript or PDF file or how to
transform plain text or POD/RD/WikiML into TeX or XML markup, or perhaps a
Ruby/Tk (or Fox) pseudo-WYSIWYG text editor that would allow for style
tags and so forth and outputs to XML or XHTML or some format that could be
fed to PS/PDF, revision management with CVS and a scripting language, and
for the CSci column an article on how Longest Common Subsequence (aka
Algorithm::Diff) works (since LCS is the basis for how CVS functions)–
and discussion of how to implement same concisely in some other language
(Haskell? Guile? Lisp? Parrot assembler?).

I’m also willing to donate time/labor/money in addition to the above
daydreams.

-michael

···

On Thursday 12 September 2002 18:44, Jim Freeze wrote:

On Fri, Sep 13, 2002 at 08:18:45AM +0900, JamesBritt wrote:

If you do not already use Linux or C++ it is unlikely you will be
reading those magazines. On the other hand, if you read Dr. Dobbs you
will at least see references to things that don’t hit your radar in
day-to-day life.

Ok, I see. My original intent for a Ruby journal would be as a resource
for Ruby programmers. I don’t see tagging along with the TDP to
be a fruitful endeavor in Ruby advocacy, but maybe I am just
not up-to-date with TDP.

However, I think that a good RDP could also be a good advocate.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Michael C. Libby x@ichimunki.com
public key: http://www.ichimunki.com/public_key.txt
web site: http://www.ichimunki.com
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

michael libby wrote:

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

If you do not already use Linux or C++ it is unlikely you will be
reading those magazines. On the other hand, if you read Dr. Dobbs you
will at least see references to things that don’t hit your radar in
day-to-day life.

Ok, I see. My original intent for a Ruby journal would be as a resource
for Ruby programmers. I don’t see tagging along with the TDP to
be a fruitful endeavor in Ruby advocacy, but maybe I am just
not up-to-date with TDP.

However, I think that a good RDP could also be a good advocate.

What I’d like to see is a journal like Dr. Dobbs without so much Microsoft
and Java, a magazine with some good features (on a theme) and then a Perl
column, a Ruby column, a Python column, a language of the month column,
and a general CSci column (algorithms or whatever)-- a heavy focus on
scripting languages as opposed to C(++)/Java and general computing.

I like this idea. It fits in with ‘Language of the Year’, best tool for the
job etc.

BTW Does anyone remember ‘Computer Language’ magazine published in the late '80s?

It might be kind of fun if the theme of the first issue were “desktop
publishing and scripting languages”… suggested articles: how to use a
scripting language library to create a postscript or PDF file or how to
transform plain text or POD/RD/WikiML into TeX or XML markup, or perhaps a
Ruby/Tk (or Fox) pseudo-WYSIWYG text editor that would allow for style
tags and so forth and outputs to XML or XHTML or some format that could be
fed to PS/PDF, revision management with CVS and a scripting language, and
for the CSci column an article on how Longest Common Subsequence (aka
Algorithm::Diff) works (since LCS is the basis for how CVS functions)–
and discussion of how to implement same concisely in some other language
(Haskell? Guile? Lisp? Parrot assembler?).

I’m also willing to donate time/labor/money in addition to the above
daydreams.

-michael

…snip

···

On Thursday 12 September 2002 18:44, Jim Freeze wrote:

On Fri, Sep 13, 2002 at 08:18:45AM +0900, JamesBritt wrote:

Jan

‘Imagination is more important than knowledge’ - Albert Einstein