Tracking code & scripts

Hey all,

I was hoping to get some advice on how every keeps track of their own
personal scripts and development. I have several scripts which I use for
various tasks and I regularly have to update them and make small changes
to them. At present I am using an Excel spreadsheet to track changes and
version upgrades but this is dirty.

Does anyone have any other suggestions?

···

--
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.

Hey all,

I was hoping to get some advice on how every keeps track of their own
personal scripts and development. I have several scripts which I use for
various tasks and I regularly have to update them and make small changes
to them. At present I am using an Excel spreadsheet to track changes and
version upgrades but this is dirty.

Does anyone have any other suggestions?

http://git-scm.com/

Dave.

···

On 9 Nov 2010, at 15:14, Stuart Clarke wrote:

--
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/\.

It sounds like you want a version control solution. A spreadsheet is
definitely lacking. I suggest you use Git:

http://git-scm.com/

It's supported on a wide range of platforms, efficient, and relatively
easy to use for basic work. It also does not require that you set up
any kind of server, unlike another popular alternative named Subversion
(SVN). You can keep everything right in your workspace.

-Jeremy

···

On 11/9/2010 9:14 AM, Stuart Clarke wrote:

Hey all,

I was hoping to get some advice on how every keeps track of their own
personal scripts and development. I have several scripts which I use for
various tasks and I regularly have to update them and make small changes
to them. At present I am using an Excel spreadsheet to track changes and
version upgrades but this is dirty.

Does anyone have any other suggestions?

Use decent version control. Like Mercurial: mercurial.selenic.com

It wins over Git in three instances: 1) It is fast on non-Linux
systems, 2) it has a syntax that is not arcane, 3) it works very well
for a sole developer (you'll only need "hq init", "hg add", "hg commit
-m 'message'", and "hg update [version]").

···

On Tue, Nov 9, 2010 at 4:14 PM, Stuart Clarke <stuart.clarke1986@gmail.com> wrote:

Hey all,

I was hoping to get some advice on how every keeps track of their own
personal scripts and development. I have several scripts which I use for
various tasks and I regularly have to update them and make small changes
to them. At present I am using an Excel spreadsheet to track changes and
version upgrades but this is dirty.

Does anyone have any other suggestions?

--
Phillip Gawlowski

Though the folk I have met,
(Ah, how soon!) they forget
When I've moved on to some other place,
There may be one or two,
When I've played and passed through,
Who'll remember my song or my face.

Not to be too picky here, but point 3 is exactly equivalent to what you
would do with git in this instance. :slight_smile:

I haven't personally used hg myself, but a GUI should help both git and
hg be easier for a novice user. For git on Windows there is TortoiseGit:

http://code.google.com/p/tortoisegit/

I'm sure hg has an equivalent.

Regarding the performance, I'm fairly sure that for small projects such
as that proposed here the difference in negligible. Also, I don't think
there are performance problems for git on anything *except* Windows.
Git on Windows has been improving at any rate.

In any case, there are some great options available. Give some a try,
and pick what fits best into your work flow.

-Jeremy

···

On 11/9/2010 11:26 AM, Phillip Gawlowski wrote:

On Tue, Nov 9, 2010 at 4:14 PM, Stuart Clarke > <stuart.clarke1986@gmail.com> wrote:

Hey all,

I was hoping to get some advice on how every keeps track of their own
personal scripts and development. I have several scripts which I use for
various tasks and I regularly have to update them and make small changes
to them. At present I am using an Excel spreadsheet to track changes and
version upgrades but this is dirty.

Does anyone have any other suggestions?

Use decent version control. Like Mercurial: mercurial.selenic.com

It wins over Git in three instances: 1) It is fast on non-Linux
systems, 2) it has a syntax that is not arcane, 3) it works very well
for a sole developer (you'll only need "hq init", "hg add", "hg commit
-m 'message'", and "hg update [version]").