Selling ruby to my boss

So I’ve just started working as the sole programmer at a non-profit
which is heavily internet-based. Most of the code is in PHP or Perl,
and I would like to gradually migrate it to Ruby over time.

I get a lot of leeway in this job, but this sort of a decision is
probably the sort of thing I’d have to justify to my boss, who’s
likely to be nervous about it. Not about my ability to be more
productive with Ruby, but with the fact that Ruby is an uncommon
language compared to PHP and Perl. So if I get hit by a truck, or if
the organization expands and needs to hire new programmers, or when
we’re looking for interns, it will be harder to find programmers who
know Ruby.

Anybody have any advice as to what I can say him to make him less
nervous about making such a transition?

Francis

A good Perl programmer can learn Ruby in literally a day. I did. He
just needs a good reference.

···

On Thu, Jul 18, 2002 at 10:14:18AM +0900, Francis Hwang wrote:

Anybody have any advice as to what I can say him to make him less
nervous about making such a transition?

Hi –

···

On Thu, 18 Jul 2002, Francis Hwang wrote:

So I’ve just started working as the sole programmer at a non-profit
which is heavily internet-based. Most of the code is in PHP or Perl,
and I would like to gradually migrate it to Ruby over time.

I get a lot of leeway in this job, but this sort of a decision is
probably the sort of thing I’d have to justify to my boss, who’s
likely to be nervous about it. Not about my ability to be more
productive with Ruby, but with the fact that Ruby is an uncommon
language compared to PHP and Perl. So if I get hit by a truck, or if
the organization expands and needs to hire new programmers, or when
we’re looking for interns, it will be harder to find programmers who
know Ruby.

Anybody have any advice as to what I can say him to make him less
nervous about making such a transition?

One thing you might mention is the recent Intel job posting for a Perl
or Ruby programmer. (I’m not a big Intel fan, but it’s certainly
mainstream.)

David


David Alan Black
home: dblack@candle.superlink.net
work: blackdav@shu.edu
Web: http://pirate.shu.edu/~blackdav

Francis Hwang wrote:

So I’ve just started working as the sole programmer at a non-profit
which is heavily internet-based. Most of the code is in PHP or Perl,
and I would like to gradually migrate it to Ruby over time.

I get a lot of leeway in this job, but this sort of a decision is
probably the sort of thing I’d have to justify to my boss, who’s
likely to be nervous about it. Not about my ability to be more
productive with Ruby, but with the fact that Ruby is an uncommon
language compared to PHP and Perl. So if I get hit by a truck, or if
the organization expands and needs to hire new programmers, or when
we’re looking for interns, it will be harder to find programmers who
know Ruby.

Anybody have any advice as to what I can say him to make him less
nervous about making such a transition?

Tell him there are lots of people on the ruby-talk mailing list who
would love a Ruby programming job. You can mention my name first if
you’d like. :wink:

···


Jason Voegele
"We believe that we invent symbols. The truth is that they invent us."
– Gene Wolfe, The Book of the New Sun

Francis Hwang sera@fhwang.net writes:

So I’ve just started working as the sole programmer at a non-profit
which is heavily internet-based. Most of the code is in PHP or Perl,
and I would like to gradually migrate it to Ruby over time.

If it helps there’s at least one precedent: I’m halfway through
writing the membership management system for a non-profit in Ruby.

Cheers

Dave

Maybe not as much talking as doing. I have experienced similar
comments, and it is understandable considering programming
languages heretofore. Ruby just doesn’t fit any existing mold.
Dave Thomas has some slides on his website of a presentation
of Ruby to a Perl group. The title slide describes Ruby as
a transparent language. And it is.

Learning Ruby is not an issue. As said earlier, it can be
learned in a day by a good Perl programmer. I would alter that
a little. One can grasp the essentials in a day. Within
a week you can be comfortable with 95% of the language fundamentals.
At that time, I think most people could define their programming
in Ruby as-productive-as or more-productive-than any language they
previously knew.

It may be pointless to address the issue directly to your boss, but
it is such an easy target. :slight_smile: This may not be a (or the) real issue.
It may be the first one he came up with. But it is one that can be
covered en-mass in a presentation to your company.

My personal take on this type of comment is not that you have a language
that is unfamiliar to people and it may be difficult to find people to
maintain the code-- the issue is code maintenance. Maintenance is
best addressed with well defined coding standards, clear requirements/functional/
design documentation, and most importantly, a comprehensive set
of test cases(Ruby really excels here). Language is not in any of
the top four categories.

The humerous part of the original statement is that perl is not very
readable. In fact, it can be a write-only language. I’m sure you
have heard of the saying- “When I wrote that code (in perl) only
God and myself knew what it said. One week later, only God knew
what it said.” At my company, there has been a tremendous expense
trying to ressurect old perl code.

I myself have been programming in Ruby for over a year now and I
manage a programmer who is using Ruby. We have other developers
who use skill and perl and I have attended code reviews for
all three languages. There is no question that Ruby code is easier
to maintain.

One interesting aspect of Ruby, even non-programmers are able to
sit in on a Ruby code review, understand what the code is doing and
make suggestions. That is not always true with Perl and Skill–even
with experienced programmers.

Well, sorry to be so long winded. I hope some of this helps.
Good luck in your efforts.

···

On Thu, Jul 18, 2002 at 10:14:18AM +0900, Francis Hwang wrote:

So I’ve just started working as the sole programmer at a non-profit
which is heavily internet-based. Most of the code is in PHP or Perl,
and I would like to gradually migrate it to Ruby over time.

I get a lot of leeway in this job, but this sort of a decision is
probably the sort of thing I’d have to justify to my boss, who’s
likely to be nervous about it. Not about my ability to be more
productive with Ruby, but with the fact that Ruby is an uncommon
language compared to PHP and Perl. So if I get hit by a truck, or if
the organization expands and needs to hire new programmers, or when
we’re looking for interns, it will be harder to find programmers who
know Ruby.

Anybody have any advice as to what I can say him to make him less
nervous about making such a transition?


Jim Freeze
If only I had something clever to say for my comment…
~

In article <a05100300b95bc60d7e7d@[10.0.1.12]>,

So I’ve just started working as the sole programmer at a non-profit
which is heavily internet-based. Most of the code is in PHP or Perl,
and I would like to gradually migrate it to Ruby over time.

I get a lot of leeway in this job, but this sort of a decision is
probably the sort of thing I’d have to justify to my boss, who’s
likely to be nervous about it. Not about my ability to be more
productive with Ruby, but with the fact that Ruby is an uncommon
language compared to PHP and Perl. So if I get hit by a truck, or if
the organization expands and needs to hire new programmers, or when
we’re looking for interns, it will be harder to find programmers who
know Ruby.

Anybody have any advice as to what I can say him to make him less
nervous about making such a transition?

There was a time when nobody in the US knew about Ruby and those of us
who were using Ruby were considered to be some sort of fringe element, but
the times they are’a chang’in… Now several Ruby books are in print and
there are lots of folks who are at least aware of Ruby. For example, the
O’Reilly book “Mastering Regular Expressions” covers Ruby in the recently
released second edition. And Ruby is being used at several large
companies (Agilent and Intel are two that come to mind).

It’s also quite true that Perl programmers can pick up Ruby pretty
quickly. And IMHO Ruby code tends to be more maintainable than Perl code.

Phil

···

Francis Hwang sera@fhwang.net wrote:

Francis Hwang sera@fhwang.net writes:

So I’ve just started working as the sole programmer at a non-profit
which is heavily internet-based. Most of the code is in PHP or Perl,
and I would like to gradually migrate it to Ruby over time.

I get a lot of leeway in this job, but this sort of a decision is
probably the sort of thing I’d have to justify to my boss, who’s
likely to be nervous about it. Not about my ability to be more
productive with Ruby, but with the fact that Ruby is an uncommon
language compared to PHP and Perl. So if I get hit by a truck, or if
the organization expands and needs to hire new programmers, or when
we’re looking for interns, it will be harder to find programmers who
know Ruby.

Anybody have any advice as to what I can say him to make him less
nervous about making such a transition?

I am working as a Common Lisp programmer in a major Norwegian Internet
service provider. We have developed server software in Lisp for about
five years (I am a relatively new member of the team; I started
working here in April last year). Finding new Lisp programmers has
never been a problem. Although few people know the language, those
who do are usually very skillful. Being familiar with a very powerful
and dynamic language, they also tend to intensely dislike working in
mainstream languages like Java, Perl or C++. The few Lisp jobs
available are therefore very attractive.

I think Ruby is similar to Lisp in this respect. By choosing Ruby
instead of PHP or Perl, your boss is likely to make the company an
attractive workplace for the most skillful programmers. Instead of
getting a big number of mostly incompetent candidates to new
positions, you are likely to get a smaller number of very good ones.

···


Tord Romstad

hello all,
i am desperately trying to get ruby opengl to
compile properly for os x, but to no avail.
i’ve already asked this list about it several
times, but it seems nobody is doing opengl
on os x. with such a large japanese user base,
i’m sure somebody in japan must be doing it.
if somebody here who speaks japanese would
be kind enough to ask on the japanese list if
anybody has gotten it to work i’d be eternally grateful.
thanks much,
c

Jim Freeze schrieb:

One interesting aspect of Ruby, even non-programmers
are able to sit in on a Ruby code review, understand
what the code is doing and make suggestions.

Wow! How do you achieve that?
Or in another way: Who are your ‘non-programmers’?

I don’t believe that this is a property of
Ruby itsself as you can write sophisticated
code in this language that is readable only
to experienced programmers which are familiar
with basic concepts of IT in general and Ruby
in particular.
So there must be more … ?

Bye
Det

maybe this helps, too.
http://www.rubygarden.org/ruby?RealWorldRuby

I agree that ease of maintainability is a good selling point.
(esp. if you code tons of tests making it easier for other people
to pick up the language).

The 2nd selling point might be that if you use the right
tool for the right task, you are more productive – meaning
the project will be cheaper or they will get more functionality
in the same time.

Good luck,
A

···

Am Donnerstag, 18. Juli 2002 07:39 schrieben Sie:

On Thu, Jul 18, 2002 at 10:14:18AM +0900, Francis Hwang wrote:

So I’ve just started working as the sole programmer at a non-profit
which is heavily internet-based. Most of the code is in PHP or Perl,
and I would like to gradually migrate it to Ruby over time.

I get a lot of leeway in this job, but this sort of a decision is
probably the sort of thing I’d have to justify to my boss, who’s
likely to be nervous about it. Not about my ability to be more
productive with Ruby, but with the fact that Ruby is an uncommon
language compared to PHP and Perl. So if I get hit by a truck, or if
the organization expands and needs to hire new programmers, or when
we’re looking for interns, it will be harder to find programmers who
know Ruby.

Anybody have any advice as to what I can say him to make him less
nervous about making such a transition?

Maybe not as much talking as doing. I have experienced similar
comments, and it is understandable considering programming
languages heretofore. Ruby just doesn’t fit any existing mold.
Dave Thomas has some slides on his website of a presentation
of Ruby to a Perl group. The title slide describes Ruby as
a transparent language. And it is.

Learning Ruby is not an issue. As said earlier, it can be
learned in a day by a good Perl programmer. I would alter that
a little. One can grasp the essentials in a day. Within
a week you can be comfortable with 95% of the language fundamentals.
At that time, I think most people could define their programming
in Ruby as-productive-as or more-productive-than any language they
previously knew.

It may be pointless to address the issue directly to your boss, but
it is such an easy target. :slight_smile: This may not be a (or the) real issue.
It may be the first one he came up with. But it is one that can be
covered en-mass in a presentation to your company.

My personal take on this type of comment is not that you have a language
that is unfamiliar to people and it may be difficult to find people to
maintain the code-- the issue is code maintenance. Maintenance is
best addressed with well defined coding standards, clear
requirements/functional/ design documentation, and most importantly, a
comprehensive set
of test cases(Ruby really excels here). Language is not in any of
the top four categories.

The humerous part of the original statement is that perl is not very
readable. In fact, it can be a write-only language. I’m sure you
have heard of the saying- “When I wrote that code (in perl) only
God and myself knew what it said. One week later, only God knew
what it said.” At my company, there has been a tremendous expense
trying to ressurect old perl code.

I myself have been programming in Ruby for over a year now and I
manage a programmer who is using Ruby. We have other developers
who use skill and perl and I have attended code reviews for
all three languages. There is no question that Ruby code is easier
to maintain.

One interesting aspect of Ruby, even non-programmers are able to
sit in on a Ruby code review, understand what the code is doing and
make suggestions. That is not always true with Perl and Skill–even
with experienced programmers.

Well, sorry to be so long winded. I hope some of this helps.
Good luck in your efforts.


Armin.


Armin Roehrl, http://www.approximity.com
Training, Development and Mentoring
OOP, XP, Java, Ruby, Smalltalk, Datamining, Parallel computing, Webservices

Rubybuch: http://approximity.com/rubybuch/
Nächstes Rubyseminar: 9/9-11/9 in Hamburg.

Agile Entwicklerkonferenz: 22. und 23.10 in Nürnberg.
http://www.approximity.com/public/conferences/AgileConf.html

Hmmm, never thought of that. However, from the posts I see on this
list, I tend to think it might be true.

···

On Thu, Jul 18, 2002 at 07:09:33PM +0900, Tord Kallqvist Romstad wrote:

Francis Hwang sera@fhwang.net writes:

I am working as a Common Lisp programmer in a major Norwegian Internet
service provider. We have developed server software in Lisp for about
five years (I am a relatively new member of the team; I started
working here in April last year). Finding new Lisp programmers has
never been a problem. Although few people know the language, those
who do are usually very skillful. Being familiar with a very powerful
and dynamic language, they also tend to intensely dislike working in
mainstream languages like Java, Perl or C++. The few Lisp jobs
available are therefore very attractive.

I think Ruby is similar to Lisp in this respect. By choosing Ruby
instead of PHP or Perl, your boss is likely to make the company an
attractive workplace for the most skillful programmers. Instead of
getting a big number of mostly incompetent candidates to new
positions, you are likely to get a smaller number of very good ones.


Jim Freeze
If only I had something clever to say for my comment…
~

Hi,

···

At Thu, 18 Jul 2002 15:10:29 +0900, ccos wrote:

i am desperately trying to get ruby opengl to
compile properly for os x, but to no avail.

Haven’t you succeeded with the patch in [ruby-talk:44543]?


Nobu Nakada

Dirk Detering wrote:

Jim Freeze schrieb:

One interesting aspect of Ruby, even non-programmers
are able to sit in on a Ruby code review, understand
what the code is doing and make suggestions.

Wow! How do you achieve that?
Or in another way: Who are your ‘non-programmers’?

I’ve seen some pretty messy looking code in this list. Especially the
one liners that do some crazy task. But all the code I’ve written is
pretty simple. I guess it depends on those who originally code something.

A couple of reasons why we can do this.

  1. We don’t go overboard with esoteric coding.
  2. Ruby reads very much like you would say something
    in english. In fact it is not very difficult to convert
    pseudo code into ruby. In fact, sometimes the pseudo
    code runs just fine. :slight_smile:

Consider the following examples:

Our company has coding standards for skill that require
developers to write things as:

;; Make an assignment in skill
(setq x 5)

;; Make an assignment in Ruby
x = 5

;; Convert an angle from radians to degrees in skill
(setq phase (times (atan2 tmpVal2 tmpVal)
(quotient 180.0 3.14159265)))

Convert an angle from radians to degrees in Ruby

phase = 180.0/Math::PI * atan2(tmpVal2, tmpVal)

To most people (and all non-coders) I think Ruby is the easier
of the two to read.
Ruby reads more like I would describe something to someone else.
For example, take the following skill code:

numbers = '(1 2 3 ) => ( 1 2 3 )
(setq first ( car numbers )) => 1

I don’t think that anytime in the near future I am going to say 'car list’
to someone when I am telling them to take the first item in a list.

And then there’s Perl:

Derivative in Perl

for $row(1…$#$data_ref) {

$deriv[$row][$col] = ($$data_ref[$row][$col+1] - $$data_ref[$row][$col-1])/$h;

Are you sure you have your $$'s right and the correct precence is

automatically applied?

}

Derivative in Ruby

data.size.times { |row|

deriv[row][col] = (data[row][col+1] - data[row][col-1])/h
}

$.02

···

On Thu, Jul 18, 2002 at 03:33:38PM +0900, Dirk Detering wrote:

Jim Freeze schrieb:

One interesting aspect of Ruby, even non-programmers
are able to sit in on a Ruby code review, understand
what the code is doing and make suggestions.

Wow! How do you achieve that?
Or in another way: Who are your ‘non-programmers’?


Jim Freeze
If only I had something clever to say for my comment…
~

Hi,

i am desperately trying to get ruby opengl to
compile properly for os x, but to no avail.

Haven’t you succeeded with the patch in [ruby-talk:44543]?


Nobu Nakada

hi,
no. this is what i tried.

my directory:

ChangeLog README.EUC glu.c ogl.c rbogl.c sample
MANIFEST extconf.rb glut.c ogl_patch rbogl.h

the patch:

extconf.rb.org Sat Jul 06 00:29:30 2002
+++ extconf.rb Sat Jul 06 00:33:16 2002
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@
glu_libname = "glu32"
glut_libname = "glut32"
else

  • $CFLAGS += " -I."
  • $CFLAGS += " -I.
    -I/System/Library/Frameworks/OpenGL.framework/Headers
    -I/System/Library/Frameworks/GLUT/Headers"

    dir_config(“x11”, “/usr/X11R6”)

ogl.c.org Sat Jul 06 00:34:36 2002
+++ ogl.c Sat Jul 06 00:35:10 2002
@@ -5,7 +5,8 @@
#if defined (WIN32)

include “windows.h”

#endif
-#include “GL/gl.h”
+/#include “GL/gl.h”/
+#include “gl.h”
#include “rbogl.h”

#if defined CYGWIN
glut.c.org Sat Jul 06 00:34:24 2002
+++ glut.c Sat Jul 06 00:35:28 2002
@@ -5,7 +5,8 @@
#if defined(WIN32)

include “windows.h”

#endif
-#include “GL/glut.h”
+/*#include “GL/glut.h” */
+#include “glut.h”
#include “ruby.h”

static int callId; /* ‘call’ method id */
glu.c.org Sat Jul 06 00:37:42 2002
+++ glu.c Sat Jul 06 00:38:24 2002
@@ -5,8 +5,12 @@
#if defined(WIN32)

include “windows.h”

#endif
+/*
#include “GL/gl.h”
#include “GL/glu.h”
+*/
+#include “gl.h”
+#include “glu.h”
#include “rbogl.h”

#ifdef WIN32
rbogl.c.org Sat Jul 06 00:37:32 2002
+++ rbogl.c Sat Jul 06 00:38:08 2002
@@ -6,7 +6,8 @@

include “windows.h”

#endif
#include “rbogl.h”
-#include “GL/gl.h”
+/* #include “GL/gl.h” */
+#include “gl.h”

#ifdef NO_NUM2DBL
extern double

then i did this:

[localhost:Ruby/trials/opengl] user% patch -p0 <ogl_patch

patching file extconf.rb
patching file ogl.c
patching file glut.c
patching file glu.c
patching file rbogl.c
patch unexpectedly ends in middle of line
Hunk #1 succeeded at 6 with fuzz 1.

[localhost:Ruby/trials/opengl] user% ruby extconf.rb
checking for () in -lGL… yes
checking for () in -lGLU… yes
creating Makefile
checking for XAllowDeviceEvents() in -lXi… yes
checking for XMITMiscGetBugMode() in -lXext… yes
checking for XmuAddCloseDisplayHook() in -lXmu… yes
checking for () in -lglut… yes
creating Makefile

[localhost:Ruby/trials/opengl] user% make

Now Making glut extend module
gcc -fno-common -no-cpp-precomp -flat_namespace -pipe -no-precomp -I.
-I/System/Library/Frameworks/OpenGL.framework/Headers
-I/System/Library/Frameworks/GLUT/Headers -I.
-I/usr/local/lib/ruby/1.6/powerpc-darwin5.3 -I. -I/usr/local/include
-I/usr/X11R6/include -c -o glut.o glut.c
glut.c:9: glut.h: No such file or directory
glut.c: In function glut_SetColor': glut.c:818:GLfloat’ undeclared (first use in this function)
glut.c:818: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once
glut.c:818: for each function it appears in.)
glut.c:818: parse error before red' glut.c:822:red’ undeclared (first use in this function)
glut.c:822: parse error before `rb_num2dbl’

… a lot more undeclared errors and warnings here …

glut.c:1458: GLUT_CURSOR_NONE' undeclared (first use in this function) glut.c:1459:GLUT_CURSOR_FULL_CROSSHAIR’ undeclared (first use in this
function)
glut.c: At top level:
glut.c:159: warning: glut_SpecialFuncCallback' used but never defined glut.c:160: warning:glut_SpaceballMotionFuncCallback’ used but never
defined
glut.c:161: warning: glut_SpaceballRotateFuncCallback' used but never defined glut.c:162: warning:glut_SpaceballButtonFuncCallback’ used but never
defined
glut.c:163: warning: glut_ButtonBoxFuncCallback' used but never defined glut.c:164: warning:glut_DialsFuncCallback’ used but never defined
glut.c:165: warning: glut_TabletMotionFuncCallback' used but never defined glut.c:166: warning:glut_TabletButtonFuncCallback’ used but never
defined
glut.c:170: warning: glut_OverlayDisplayFuncCallback' used but never defined glut.c:171: warning:glut_WindowStatusFuncCallback’ used but never
defined
make[1]: *** [glut.o] Error 1
make: *** [glut.bundle] Error 2

···

At Thu, 18 Jul 2002 15:10:29 +0900, > ccos wrote:

Isaac wrote:

Dirk Detering wrote:

Jim Freeze schrieb:

One interesting aspect of Ruby, even non-programmers
are able to sit in on a Ruby code review, understand
what the code is doing and make suggestions.

Wow! How do you achieve that?
Or in another way: Who are your ‘non-programmers’?

I’ve seen some pretty messy looking code in this list. Especially the
one liners that do some crazy task. But all the code I’ve written is
pretty simple. I guess it depends on those who originally code something.

Is there a Convoluted Ruby Contest like there is for Perl?

···


Giuseppe “Oblomov” Bilotta

Axiom I of the Giuseppe Bilotta
theory of IT:
Anything is better than MS

Hi,

···

At Thu, 18 Jul 2002 18:05:02 +0900, ccos wrote:

Now Making glut extend module
gcc -fno-common -no-cpp-precomp -flat_namespace -pipe -no-precomp
-I. -I/System/Library/Frameworks/OpenGL.framework/Headers
-I/System/Library/Frameworks/GLUT/Headers
-I. -I/usr/local/lib/ruby/1.6/powerpc-darwin5.3
-I. -I/usr/local/include -I/usr/X11R6/include -c -o glut.o glut.c
glut.c:9: glut.h: No such file or directory

The headers didn’t been find. Do you have glut.h in
/System/Library/Frameworks/GLUT/Headers?


Nobu Nakada

Hello –

Isaac wrote:

I’ve seen some pretty messy looking code in this list. Especially the
one liners that do some crazy task. But all the code I’ve written is
pretty simple. I guess it depends on those who originally code something.

Is there a Convoluted Ruby Contest like there is for Perl?

Actually, sort of the opposite, almost… Last year there were plans
for a Code Amelioration Contest – that is, a contest based on the
improvement and clarification of (deliberately) obscure Ruby code.
The theory behind it was that Ruby excels at facilitating clear,
readable code, so that it harmonizes more with the language to go in
that direction than toward obscurity. (Besides, the world is already
full of obfuscated code contests :slight_smile:

The Amerlioratin Contest never quite happened, because it was
scheduled for the conference in October 2001 and in the weeks leading
up to that conference people weren’t really in the mood to write
entries.

David

···

On Fri, 19 Jul 2002, Giuseppe Bilotta wrote:


David Alan Black
home: dblack@candle.superlink.net
work: blackdav@shu.edu
Web: http://pirate.shu.edu/~blackdav

The headers didn’t been find. Do you have glut.h in
/System/Library/Frameworks/GLUT/Headers?

hey there,
thanks for the tip. ok, i changed the patch to read
"/System/Library/Frameworks/GLUT.framework/Headers".
i’m not sure if this is even the right way to go about using frameworks
though, from the little i’ve seen of C and Obj-C
on osc x? anyway, now i get a shorter but just as ominous sounding list
of errors:

[localhost:Ruby/trials/opengl] user% ls
ChangeLog README.EUC glu.c ogl.c rbogl.c sample
MANIFEST extconf.rb glut.c ogl_patch rbogl.h

[localhost:Ruby/trials/opengl] user% patch -p0 <ogl_patch

patching file extconf.rb
patching file ogl.c
patching file glut.c
patching file glu.c
patching file rbogl.c

[localhost:Ruby/trials/opengl] user% ruby extconf.rb

checking for () in -lGL… yes
checking for () in -lGLU… yes
creating Makefile
checking for XAllowDeviceEvents() in -lXi… yes
checking for XMITMiscGetBugMode() in -lXext… yes
checking for XmuAddCloseDisplayHook() in -lXmu… yes
checking for () in -lglut… yes
creating Makefile

[localhost:Ruby/trials/opengl] user% make

Now Making glut extend module
gcc -fno-common -no-cpp-precomp -flat_namespace -pipe -no-precomp -I.
-I/System/Library/Frameworks/OpenGL.framework/Headers
-I/System/Library/Frameworks/GLUT.framework/Headers -I.
-I/usr/local/lib/ruby/1.6/powerpc-darwin5.3 -I. -I/usr/local/include
-I/usr/X11R6/include -c -o glut.o glut.c
glut.c: In function glut_KeyboardFunc': glut.c:148: warning: passing arg 1 ofglutKeyboardFunc’ from
incompatible pointer type
gcc: -flat_namespace: linker input file unused since linking not done
cc -dynamic -bundle -undefined suppress -flat_namespace
-L/usr/X11R6/lib -L/usr/local/lib/ruby/1.6/powerpc-darwin5.3
-L/usr/local/lib -L/usr/X11R6/lib
-L/usr/local/lib/ruby/1.6/powerpc-darwin5.3 -L/usr/local/lib -o
glut.bundle glut.o libruby.a -lglut -lXmu -lXext -lXi -lGLU -lGL -lX11
-lXmu
make[1]: *** [glut.bundle] Error 1
make: *** [glut.bundle] Error 2

···

cc: libruby.a: No such file or directory