Programs to Emulate


(scooby doo) #1

I’m looking for some well written, small & simple
applications, written in Ruby, that would be good
exercise to try to emulate.

I’m new to Ruby and programming. I have some basics
down from following some online tutorials.

-Scooby

Anyone?

···

Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard - Read only the mail you want.
http://antispam.yahoo.com/tools


(Simon Strandgaard) #2

I’m looking for some well written, small & simple
applications, written in Ruby, that would be good
exercise to try to emulate.

Sorry, I am a little confused over ‘emulate’?

B: emulate ruby -> make own ruby interpreter?

What exactly do you mean?

···

On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 07:23:45 +0900, scooby doo wrote:
A: educational pieces of Ruby to learn from?


Simon Strandgaard


(Tom Copeland) #3

The Cerise code looks pretty good to me:

http://tinyurl.com/2vrxx

Yours,

Tom

···

On Thu, 2004-02-19 at 17:23, scooby doo wrote:

I’m looking for some well written, small & simple
applications, written in Ruby, that would be good
exercise to try to emulate.

I’m new to Ruby and programming. I have some basics
down from following some online tutorials.


(Ara.T.Howard) #4

I’m looking for some well written, small & simple
applications, written in Ruby, that would be good
exercise to try to emulate.

I’m new to Ruby and programming.

welcome on board.

I have some basics down from following some online tutorials.

-Scooby

Anyone?

the standard libraries are good (i should hope)

~ > find /usr/local/lib/ruby -name ‘*rb’

or

~ > ls /usr/local/lib/ruby/1.8/*rb

(or whatever on you machine)

you will be suprised to find that many of them are quite short a easy to read.

try

pstore.rb
logger.rb
open3.rb
tempfile.rb
singleton.rb
ftools.rb

for some straight forward ones. the advantage to studying these is that you
will also be able to find docs and examples from them, even if it’s only by
searching clr.

-a

···

On Fri, 20 Feb 2004, scooby doo wrote:

===============================================================================

EMAIL :: Ara [dot] T [dot] Howard [at] noaa [dot] gov
PHONE :: 303.497.6469
ADDRESS :: E/GC2 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305-3328
URL :: http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/
TRY :: for l in ruby perl;do $l -e “print “\x3a\x2d\x29\x0a””;done
===============================================================================


(Chris Corwin) #5

greetings, i also am new to ruby

what does “searching clr” mean?

(by new to ruby, i mean, as of yesterday, i decided to learn it,
instead of python, i think)

- me
···

On Feb 20, 2004, at 11:04 AM, Ara.T.Howard wrote:

the advantage to studying these is that you
will also be able to find docs and examples from them, even if it’s
only by
searching clr.


> SELECT * FROM clients WHERE clue > 0
0 rows returned

</details>

(Ara.T.Howard) #6

the advantage to studying these is that you
will also be able to find docs and examples from them, even if it’s
only by
searching clr.

greetings, i also am new to ruby

what does “searching clr” mean?
^^^
^^^
comp.lang.ruby

(by new to ruby, i mean, as of yesterday, i decided to learn it, instead of
python, i think)

a wise man

  • me

> SELECT * FROM clients WHERE clue > 0
0 rows returned

-a

···

On Sat, 21 Feb 2004, Chris Corwin wrote:

On Feb 20, 2004, at 11:04 AM, Ara.T.Howard wrote:

===============================================================================
EMAIL :: Ara [dot] T [dot] Howard [at] noaa [dot] gov
PHONE :: 303.497.6469
ADDRESS :: E/GC2 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305-3328
URL :: http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/stp/
TRY :: for l in ruby perl;do $l -e “print “\x3a\x2d\x29\x0a””;done
===============================================================================