Modern smalltalk and lisp learning environments

While reading through 99 messages in a thread about "Rails as a
first language", I noticed several wistful references to smalltalk and
lisp.

I put this note at the end of the thread but I guess people had stopped
reading
the thread so here is my note at the head of its own thread.

I am a ruby enthusiast. But I cannot let go of both lisp and smalltalk.

The good news is that really good books and working environments have
recently become available for both languages.

For smalltalk see:
http://smallwiki.unibe.ch/botsinc/

This book uses a modified squeak environment.

For lisp see:
http://www.gigamonkeys.com/book/

Examples use LispInaBox and introduce 'slime' in emacs.

My guess is that people who read 100 messages in this thread will be
interested in marketing FOSS.
My friend, Mo, has just published a killer marketing book targeted to busy
people who could benefit from free open source software. Mo presents many
scenarios depicting how FOSS is very useful. Unfortunately, he is not a
programmer and has no scenarios based on ruby or rails. Check the book out
and if you think it is headed in the right direction send Mo or me some
scenarios.

http://freedomsoftware.info/

John

I could never go for the smalltalk route for much the same reason that I
didn't take well to Pascal, just too much typing.

C was much easier on the finger muscles.

···

On Thu, 04 Aug 2005 06:07:31 +0900, John Knight wrote:

While reading through 99 messages in a thread about "Rails as a
first language", I noticed several wistful references to smalltalk and
lisp.

I put this note at the end of the thread but I guess people had stopped
reading
the thread so here is my note at the head of its own thread.

I am a ruby enthusiast. But I cannot let go of both lisp and smalltalk.

The good news is that really good books and working environments have
recently become available for both languages.

For smalltalk see:
http://smallwiki.unibe.ch/botsinc/

This book uses a modified squeak environment.

For lisp see:
Practical Common Lisp

Examples use LispInaBox and introduce 'slime' in emacs.

My guess is that people who read 100 messages in this thread will be
interested in marketing FOSS.
My friend, Mo, has just published a killer marketing book targeted to busy
people who could benefit from free open source software. Mo presents many
scenarios depicting how FOSS is very useful. Unfortunately, he is not a
programmer and has no scenarios based on ruby or rails. Check the book out
and if you think it is headed in the right direction send Mo or me some
scenarios.

http://freedomsoftware.info/

John

John Knight wrote:

The good news is that really good books and working environments
have recently become available for both languages.

Well that's Lisp and Smalltalk, but how long before the same is true
for Ruby?

···

--
Chris Game

"If you ever find yourself on the side of the majority,
it is time to pause, and reflect." -- Mark Twain

Hello BearItAll,

I could never go for the smalltalk route for much the same reason that I
didn't take well to Pascal, just too much typing.

C was much easier on the finger muscles.

Oh i love class names like "ARACHNO_XML_TO_INTERNAL_PROJECT_PARSER"
i'm using them all the time. Saving a few keystrokes is the root of
all evil.

···

--
Best regards, emailto: scholz at scriptolutions dot com
Lothar Scholz http://www.ruby-ide.com
CTO Scriptolutions Ruby, PHP, Python IDE 's

BearItAll <bearitall@rassler.co.uk> writes:

I could never go for the smalltalk route for much the same reason that I
didn't take well to Pascal, just too much typing.

C was much easier on the finger muscles.

I prefer to measure the superiority of languages in lines, not
characters. :slight_smile:

···

--
Christian Neukirchen <chneukirchen@gmail.com> http://chneukirchen.org

In article <831138921.20050804185643@scriptolutions.com>,

···

Lothar Scholz <mailinglists@scriptolutions.com> wrote:

Hello BearItAll,

I could never go for the smalltalk route for much the same reason that I
didn't take well to Pascal, just too much typing.

C was much easier on the finger muscles.

Oh i love class names like "ARACHNO_XML_TO_INTERNAL_PROJECT_PARSER"
i'm using them all the time. Saving a few keystrokes is the root of
all evil.

But often key in staving off carpal tunnel...

Phil

That's why you should use some form of auto completion :slight_smile: