Command-line utilities with ruby.


(Surya Poojary) #1

Hi Rubyists,

Im planning to create simple cli utilities in ruby .. The end user should
have a ruby installed to run my utilities.. is there a way around this..?

I don't want to switch to a compiled language because i feel confident with
ruby and I love it.

Your views are well respected.

Yours Faithfully,
Poo.


(Nicola Mingotti) #2

I red around there are ways to package a Ruby software as a standalone application, but I never tried.

Since you are developing for the command line you don't need to bother much,
usually command line users are wise enough to install the scripting language they
need to run their code.

Bye
Nicola

···

On 04/03/18 18:01, Surya Poojary wrote:

Hi Rubyists,

Im planning to create simple cli utilities in ruby .. The end user should have a ruby installed to run my utilities.. is there a way around this..?

I don't want to switch to a compiled language because i feel confident with ruby and I love it.

Your views are well respected.

Yours Faithfully,
Poo.

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
--------------------------
Dr. Nicola Mingotti
R&D - Borghi Srl
CTO - BondInsider
--------------------------


(Alexander) #3

Did you take a look at Traveling Ruby ?

···

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 18:16 Nicola Mingotti <nmingotti@gmail.com> wrote:

I red around there are ways to package a Ruby software as a standalone
application, but I never tried.

Since you are developing for the command line you don't need to bother
much,
usually command line users are wise enough to install the scripting
language they
need to run their code.

Bye
Nicola

On 04/03/18 18:01, Surya Poojary wrote:

Hi Rubyists,

Im planning to create simple cli utilities in ruby .. The end user should
have a ruby installed to run my utilities.. is there a way around this..?

I don't want to switch to a compiled language because i feel confident
with ruby and I love it.

Your views are well respected.

Yours Faithfully,
Poo.

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe> <ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe><http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
--------------------------
Dr. Nicola Mingotti
R&D - Borghi Srl
CTO - BondInsider
--------------------------

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
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(Surya Poojary) #4

Thanks Alexander,

I'll surely look into it !

···

On Tue 3 Apr, 2018, 9:55 PM Alexander, <mycroft1891@gmail.com> wrote:

Did you take a look at Traveling Ruby ?
https://github.com/phusion/traveling-ruby

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 18:16 Nicola Mingotti <nmingotti@gmail.com> wrote:

I red around there are ways to package a Ruby software as a standalone
application, but I never tried.

Since you are developing for the command line you don't need to bother
much,
usually command line users are wise enough to install the scripting
language they
need to run their code.

Bye
Nicola

On 04/03/18 18:01, Surya Poojary wrote:

Hi Rubyists,

Im planning to create simple cli utilities in ruby .. The end user should
have a ruby installed to run my utilities.. is there a way around this..?

I don't want to switch to a compiled language because i feel confident
with ruby and I love it.

Your views are well respected.

Yours Faithfully,
Poo.

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe> <ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe><http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
--------------------------
Dr. Nicola Mingotti
R&D - Borghi Srl
CTO - BondInsider
--------------------------

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

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(George Drummond) #5

Travelling Ruby is a great choice.

If you are already familiar with Ruby then also take a look at Crystal Lang
<https://crystal-lang.org/>. You will find it is mostly identical to Ruby
and simple CLI tools may already run out the box.

···

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 12:25 PM Alexander <mycroft1891@gmail.com> wrote:

Did you take a look at Traveling Ruby ?
https://github.com/phusion/traveling-ruby

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 18:16 Nicola Mingotti <nmingotti@gmail.com> wrote:

I red around there are ways to package a Ruby software as a standalone
application, but I never tried.

Since you are developing for the command line you don't need to bother
much,
usually command line users are wise enough to install the scripting
language they
need to run their code.

Bye
Nicola

On 04/03/18 18:01, Surya Poojary wrote:

Hi Rubyists,

Im planning to create simple cli utilities in ruby .. The end user should
have a ruby installed to run my utilities.. is there a way around this..?

I don't want to switch to a compiled language because i feel confident
with ruby and I love it.

Your views are well respected.

Yours Faithfully,
Poo.

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe> <ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe><http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
--------------------------
Dr. Nicola Mingotti
R&D - Borghi Srl
CTO - BondInsider
--------------------------

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

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(Surya Poojary) #6

Thanks George !

Crystal looks good but it's very new.

···

On Tue 3 Apr, 2018, 10:14 PM George D, <george.drummond@buildingblok.com> wrote:

Travelling Ruby is a great choice.

If you are already familiar with Ruby then also take a look at Crystal
Lang <https://crystal-lang.org/>. You will find it is mostly identical to
Ruby and simple CLI tools may already run out the box.

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 12:25 PM Alexander <mycroft1891@gmail.com> wrote:

Did you take a look at Traveling Ruby ?
https://github.com/phusion/traveling-ruby

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 18:16 Nicola Mingotti <nmingotti@gmail.com> wrote:

I red around there are ways to package a Ruby software as a standalone
application, but I never tried.

Since you are developing for the command line you don't need to bother
much,
usually command line users are wise enough to install the scripting
language they
need to run their code.

Bye
Nicola

On 04/03/18 18:01, Surya Poojary wrote:

Hi Rubyists,

Im planning to create simple cli utilities in ruby .. The end user
should have a ruby installed to run my utilities.. is there a way around
this..?

I don't want to switch to a compiled language because i feel confident
with ruby and I love it.

Your views are well respected.

Yours Faithfully,
Poo.

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe> <ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe><http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk> <http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

--
--------------------------
Dr. Nicola Mingotti
R&D - Borghi Srl
CTO - BondInsider
--------------------------

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org
?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

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<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

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(Wolf) #7

Hi,

···

On , Surya Poojary wrote:

Im planning to create simple cli utilities in ruby .. The end user should
have a ruby installed to run my utilities.. is there a way around this..?

On linux I would just assume anyone using console is able to install
ruby from system repository or something.

If you are targeting windows, you can give
https://github.com/larsch/ocra a try, I have fairly positive experience
with it.

W.
--
There are only two hard things in Computer Science:
cache invalidation, naming things and off-by-one errors.


(Leam Hall) #8

This usually sounds good until you realize the system repositories are
unsupported versions of Ruby. For example, Red Hat 6 uses Ruby 1.8.7,
and I think Red Hat 7 uses Ruby 2.0.0. If you use gems outside of the
Standard Library you're going to have even more fun.

When I've raised this question before there's usually a song and dance
about rvm or other things to patch together to make it work. I see two
paths; code for myself or accept that there is a reason software uses
compiled languages.

Leam

···

On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 10:45 AM, Wolf <wolf@wolfsden.cz> wrote:

Hi,

On , Surya Poojary wrote:

Im planning to create simple cli utilities in ruby .. The end user should
have a ruby installed to run my utilities.. is there a way around this..?

On linux I would just assume anyone using console is able to install
ruby from system repository or something.

If you are targeting windows, you can give
https://github.com/larsch/ocra a try, I have fairly positive experience
with it.

W.


(Andy Jones) #9

This usually sounds good until you realize the system repositories are unsupported versions of Ruby. For example, Red Hat 6 uses Ruby 1.8.7, and I think Red Hat 7 uses Ruby 2.0.0. If you use gems outside of the Standard Library you're going to have even more fun.
http://leamhall.blogspot.com/2016/08/using-ruby-187-for-fun-and-uh-fun.html

When I've raised this question before there's usually a song and dance about rvm or other things to patch together to make it work. I see two paths; code for myself or accept that there is a reason software uses compiled languages.

This.

Really, deployment is Ruby's Achilles' Heel. There is literally no good, universal, easy way to solve this problem at the moment. To be fair, Perl, Python, Node et al, all suffer from the same problem to a greater or lesser extent: you are expected to install the language yourself, and then use some special tool to install third-party libraries.

If you genuinely want a good deployment story that works across platforms, then you need to use something like Go or Rust -- or, yes, Crystal, once they get Windows cross-compile working; they are busy doing that right now.

All these languages embed the source of their third-party libraries in with the source code before compiling. I've sometimes thought that, in hindsight, this would be a better approach for Ruby. But it's not easy to get there from where we are now.

Click here to view Company Information and Confidentiality Notice.<http://www.jameshall.co.uk/index.php/small-print/email-disclaimer>


(Wolf) #10

Debian stable has 2.3.3 and archlinux is on 2.5.1; but wow, I had no
idea rhel&centos are so far behind.

W.

···

On , leam hall wrote:

This usually sounds good until you realize the system repositories are
unsupported versions of Ruby. For example, Red Hat 6 uses Ruby 1.8.7,
and I think Red Hat 7 uses Ruby 2.0.0.

--
There are only two hard things in Computer Science:
cache invalidation, naming things and off-by-one errors.


(Leam Hall) #11

Leam

···

On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 11:07 AM, Wolf <wolf@wolfsden.cz> wrote:

On , leam hall wrote:

This usually sounds good until you realize the system repositories are
unsupported versions of Ruby. For example, Red Hat 6 uses Ruby 1.8.7,
and I think Red Hat 7 uses Ruby 2.0.0.

Debian stable has 2.3.3 and archlinux is on 2.5.1; but wow, I had no
idea rhel&centos are so far behind.


(Surya Poojary) #12

True as water.

Interpreted languages don't beat native code .

We could just stick to rust or golang but then we wouldn't have the ruby
flow ..

Crystal looks promising..even Nim language is good ..

But, nothing is perfect they say.

ruby.native?

Yours truly,

Poo.

This usually sounds good until you realize the system repositories are
unsupported versions of Ruby. For example, Red Hat 6 uses Ruby 1.8.7, and I
think Red Hat 7 uses Ruby 2.0.0. If you use gems outside of the Standard
Library you're going to have even more fun.
http://leamhall.blogspot.com/2016/08/using-ruby-187-for-fun-and-uh-fun.html

When I've raised this question before there's usually a song and dance
about rvm or other things to patch together to make it work. I see two
paths; code for myself or accept that there is a reason software uses
compiled languages.

This.

Really, deployment is Ruby's Achilles' Heel. There is literally no good,
universal, easy way to solve this problem at the moment. To be fair, Perl,
Python, Node et al, all suffer from the same problem to a greater or lesser
extent: you are expected to install the language yourself, and then use
some special tool to install third-party libraries.

If you genuinely want a good deployment story that works across platforms,
then you need to use something like Go or Rust -- or, yes, Crystal, once
they get Windows cross-compile working; they are busy doing that right now.

All these languages embed the source of their third-party libraries in with
the source code before compiling. I've sometimes thought that, in
hindsight, this would be a better approach for Ruby. But it's not easy to
get there from where we are now.

Click here to view Company Information and Confidentiality Notice.<
http://www.jameshall.co.uk/index.php/small-print/email-disclaimer>

···

On 04-Apr-2018 8:34 PM, "Andy Jones" <Andy.Jones@jameshall.co.uk> wrote:


(Feña Agar) #13

MRuby is meant to do things like that. (https://github.com/mruby/mruby)
The Heroku CLI tools is made with mruby if I'm not wrong.

True as water.

Interpreted languages don't beat native code .

We could just stick to rust or golang but then we wouldn't have the ruby
flow ..

Crystal looks promising..even Nim language is good ..

But, nothing is perfect they say.

ruby.native?

Yours truly,

Poo.

This usually sounds good until you realize the system repositories are
unsupported versions of Ruby. For example, Red Hat 6 uses Ruby 1.8.7, and I
think Red Hat 7 uses Ruby 2.0.0. If you use gems outside of the Standard
Library you're going to have even more fun.
http://leamhall.blogspot.com/2016/08/using-ruby-187-for-fun-and-uh-fun.html

When I've raised this question before there's usually a song and dance
about rvm or other things to patch together to make it work. I see two
paths; code for myself or accept that there is a reason software uses
compiled languages.

This.

Really, deployment is Ruby's Achilles' Heel. There is literally no good,
universal, easy way to solve this problem at the moment. To be fair, Perl,
Python, Node et al, all suffer from the same problem to a greater or lesser
extent: you are expected to install the language yourself, and then use
some special tool to install third-party libraries.

If you genuinely want a good deployment story that works across platforms,
then you need to use something like Go or Rust -- or, yes, Crystal, once
they get Windows cross-compile working; they are busy doing that right now.

All these languages embed the source of their third-party libraries in with
the source code before compiling. I've sometimes thought that, in
hindsight, this would be a better approach for Ruby. But it's not easy to
get there from where we are now.

Click here to view Company Information and Confidentiality Notice.<
http://www.jameshall.co.uk/index.php/small-print/email-disclaimer>

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>

···

On 4. April 2018 at 17:20:00, Surya Poojary (suryapjr@gmail.com) wrote:
On 04-Apr-2018 8:34 PM, "Andy Jones" <Andy.Jones@jameshall.co.uk> wrote:


(Leam Hall) #14

This may be why the vast majority of Ruby's market share is in Rails;
the end user doesn't have to use Ruby at all.

I continue to search for a mentor. Ruby draws me in to learn more OO
Design and Testing. Not sure that my future job will use Ruby but I'll
probably understand the OO world by the time I get there.

Leam

···

On 04-Apr-2018 8:34 PM, "Andy Jones" <Andy.Jones@jameshall.co.uk> wrote:

This usually sounds good until you realize the system repositories are
unsupported versions of Ruby. For example, Red Hat 6 uses Ruby 1.8.7, and I
think Red Hat 7 uses Ruby 2.0.0. If you use gems outside of the Standard
Library you're going to have even more fun.
http://leamhall.blogspot.com/2016/08/using-ruby-187-for-fun-and-uh-fun.html

When I've raised this question before there's usually a song and dance about
rvm or other things to patch together to make it work. I see two paths; code
for myself or accept that there is a reason software uses compiled
languages.
<<<<<<<<

This.

Really, deployment is Ruby's Achilles' Heel. There is literally no good,
universal, easy way to solve this problem at the moment. To be fair, Perl,
Python, Node et al, all suffer from the same problem to a greater or lesser
extent: you are expected to install the language yourself, and then use some
special tool to install third-party libraries.

If you genuinely want a good deployment story that works across platforms,
then you need to use something like Go or Rust -- or, yes, Crystal, once
they get Windows cross-compile working; they are busy doing that right now.

All these languages embed the source of their third-party libraries in with
the source code before compiling. I've sometimes thought that, in
hindsight, this would be a better approach for Ruby. But it's not easy to
get there from where we are now.


(Evgeniy Mayorov) #15

For complete console application, try Thor or Commander gems.
For console interfaces, try ffi-ncurses gem.

···

On 4/4/18, leam hall <leamhall@gmail.com> wrote:

On 04-Apr-2018 8:34 PM, "Andy Jones" <Andy.Jones@jameshall.co.uk> wrote:

This usually sounds good until you realize the system repositories are
unsupported versions of Ruby. For example, Red Hat 6 uses Ruby 1.8.7, and
I
think Red Hat 7 uses Ruby 2.0.0. If you use gems outside of the Standard
Library you're going to have even more fun.
http://leamhall.blogspot.com/2016/08/using-ruby-187-for-fun-and-uh-fun.html

When I've raised this question before there's usually a song and dance
about
rvm or other things to patch together to make it work. I see two paths;
code
for myself or accept that there is a reason software uses compiled
languages.
<<<<<<<<

This.

Really, deployment is Ruby's Achilles' Heel. There is literally no
good,
universal, easy way to solve this problem at the moment. To be fair,
Perl,
Python, Node et al, all suffer from the same problem to a greater or
lesser
extent: you are expected to install the language yourself, and then use
some
special tool to install third-party libraries.

If you genuinely want a good deployment story that works across
platforms,
then you need to use something like Go or Rust -- or, yes, Crystal, once
they get Windows cross-compile working; they are busy doing that right
now.

All these languages embed the source of their third-party libraries in
with
the source code before compiling. I've sometimes thought that, in
hindsight, this would be a better approach for Ruby. But it's not easy
to
get there from where we are now.

This may be why the vast majority of Ruby's market share is in Rails;
the end user doesn't have to use Ruby at all.

I continue to search for a mentor. Ruby draws me in to learn more OO
Design and Testing. Not sure that my future job will use Ruby but I'll
probably understand the OO world by the time I get there.

Leam

Unsubscribe: <mailto:ruby-talk-request@ruby-lang.org?subject=unsubscribe>
<http://lists.ruby-lang.org/cgi-bin/mailman/options/ruby-talk>


(Allen Maxwell) #16

RubyHACK 2018 Updates

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